Autoba abrupta (Walker, 1865)
(one synonym : Thalpochares wallengreni Snellen, 1880)
ACONTIINAE,   EREBIDAE,   NOCTUOIDEA
 
Don Herbison-Evans
(donherbisonevans@outlook.com)
and
Stella Crossley

Autoba abrupta
(Photo: courtesy of Buck Richardson, Kuranda, Queensland)

These Caterpillars are reddish, with black streaks, lateral dots, and yellow transverse stripes. It has paired oblique white stripes across 9th and 10th segments. The 3rd, 4th, and 5th segments each have four spatulate dorsal filaments, and the 5th, 6th, 7th, and 11th segments have dorsal prominences.

The caterpillars have been found feeding on:

  • Lychee ( Litchi chinensis, SAPINDACEAE ), and
  • Fig Trees ( Ficus species, MORACEAE ).

    The adult moth has pale brown wings each with a dark transverse line. The forewings also have a pale mark at each wingtip. The hindwings also have a black dot at the tornus. The moth has a wing span of about 2 cms.

    Autoba abrupta
    (Photo: courtesy of Graeme Cocks, Townsville, Queensland)

    The species is found over south-east Asia, including

  • India,
  • Thailand,

    and also in Australia in:

  • Northern Territory, and
  • Queensland.

    Autoba abrupta
    underside
    (Photo: courtesy of Graeme Cocks, Townsville, Queensland)


    Further reading :

    George Francis Hampson,
    The Fauna of British India, including Ceylon and Burma
    Lepidoptera: Moths,
    Volume 2 (1894), p. 527, No. 2129.

    Peter Hendry,
    Lepidoptera legacy of the summer that was 2010/11,
    Metamorphosis Australia,
    Issue 61 (June 2011), pp. 18-20,
    Butterflies and Other Invertebrates Club.

    Francis Walker,
    Catalogue of Lepidoptera Heterocera,
    List of the Specimens of Lepidopterous Insects in the Collection of the British Museum,
    Part 33, Supplement 3 (1865), p. 830.


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    (updated 14 February 2010)