Amyna axis (Guenée, 1852)
(previously known as Perigea axis)
ACONTIINAE,   EREBIDAE,   NOCTUOIDEA
 
Don Herbison-Evans
(donherbisonevans@yahoo.com)
and
Stella Crossley

Amyna axis
(Photo: courtesy of David L. Wagner and Shawn Binns, University of Connecticut)

This caterpillar is green with several black-edged white stripes along the back and sides. The head is either green or brown, with black spots. The caterpillar has a reduced number of prolegs, and so moves in a looper fashion. When disturbed: it thrashes its head and tail from side to side. It has been reported feeding on:

  • Amaranth ( Amaranthus species, AMARANTHACEAE ),
  • Croton ( Codiaeum variegatum, EUPHORBIACEAE ),
  • Soybeans ( Glycine max, FABACEAE ),
  • Fanpetals ( Sida species, MALVACEAE ), and
  • Heartseed ( Cardiospermum, SAPINDACEAE ).

    Amyna axis
    (Photo: courtesy of Graeme Cocks, Townsville, Queensland)

    The adult moth has rusty brown wings, with a number of thin sinuous pale lines across, and a variable white mark near the middle, of each forewing. The hindwings are plain brown. The moth has a wing span of about 2 cms.

    Amyna axis
    (Photo: courtesy of Graeme Cocks, Townsville, Queensland)

    Amyna axis
    (Photo: courtesy of Daniel H. Janzen)

    The species is found around tropics, including

  • India,
  • South Africa,

    and also in Australia in

  • Western Australia,
  • Northern Territory
  • Queensland.

    Amyna axis
    undersides
    (Photo: courtesy of Daniel H. Janzen)

    Specimens of this species are often misidentified as Amyna octo or Amyna natalis or Amyna stricta.


    Further reading :

    Achille Guenée,
    Noctuélites,
    in Boisduval & Guenée:
    Histoire naturelle des insectes; spécies général des lépidoptères,
    Volume 9, Part 5, Section 1 (1852), p. 407, No. 378b.

    Buck Richardson,
    Tropical Queensland Wildlife from Dusk to Dawn Science and Art,
    LeapFrogOz, Kuranda, 2015, p. 112.


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    (updated 27 August 2012, 7 November 2018, 13 June 2019, 23 August 2020)