Acontia detrita Butler, 1886
Marbled Shoulder
(one synonym : Tarache pallidula Warren, 1913)
ACONTIINAE,   EREBIDAE,   NOCTUOIDEA
 
Don Herbison-Evans
(donherbisonevans@outlook.com)
and
Stella Crossley

Acontia detrita
male
(Photo: courtesy of Simon Ong, Durack, Western Australia)

The adult moths of this species are dimorphic.

Acontia detrita
female
(Photo: courtesy of Trevor Jinks, North Burnett, Queensland)

The male has off-white forewings each with a broad brown margin containing a complex pattern.

Acontia detrita
male, drawing by George Francis Hampson, listed as Tarache detrita,

Catalogue of Lepidoptera Phalænæ in the British Museum,
Noctuidæ, Volume X (1910), Plate CLXXII, fig. 19,
image courtesy of Biodiversity Heritage Library, digitized by Ernst Mayr Library, Harvard University.

The female has brown forewings crossed by an irregular off-white band and with other off-white markings. The hindwings of both sexes are brown, fading somewhat toward the bases. The moths have a wingspan of about 2 cms.

Acontia detrita
female, drawing by George Francis Hampson, listed as Tarache detrita,

Catalogue of Lepidoptera Phalænæ in the British Museum,
Noctuidæ, Volume X (1910), Plate CLXXII, fig. 20,
image courtesy of Biodiversity Heritage Library, digitized by Ernst Mayr Library, Harvard University.

The species is found in Australia in

  • Western Australia,
  • Queensland, and
  • New South Wales.

    Acontia detrita
    male
    (Photo: courtesy of Ian McMillan, Imbil, Queensland)


    Further reading :

    Arthur G. Butler,
    Descriptions of 21 new genera and 103 new species of Lepidoptera Heterocera from the Australian region,
    Transactions of the Entomological Society of London,
    1886, Part 4, p. 401, No. 32.

    Peter Marriott,
    Moths of Victoria - Part 8,
    Night Moths and Allies - NOCTUOIDEA(B)
    ,
    Entomological Society of Victoria, 2017, pp. 28-29.


    previous
    back
    caterpillar
    Australian
    Australian Butterflies
    butterflies
    Australian
    home
    Lepidoptera
    Australian
    Australian Moths
    moths
    next
    next
    caterpillar

    (updated 9 August 2011, 8 October 2014)