Chenuala heliaspis (Meyrick, 1891)
Rose Anthelid
(previously known as Ocneria heliaspis)
ANTHELINAE ,   ANTHELIDAE ,   BOMBYCOIDEA
 
Don Herbison-Evans,
(donherbisonevans@outlook.com)
and
Stella Crossley

Chenuala heliaspis

This is a yellow and red hairy Caterpillar with a pair of black hair pencils on its thorax. The hairs on the head and tail are pink.

Chenuala heliaspis
(Photo: courtesy of Donald Hobern, Canberra, Australian Capital Territory)

It feeds on the foliage of various trees, such as:

  • Gum Trees ( Eucalyptus, MYRTACEAE ),
  • Wattle ( Acacia, MIMOSACEAE ), and
  • Pine ( Pinus, PINACEAE ).

    It grows to a length of 5 cms, and pupates in a cocoon in the foodplant foliage.

    Chenuala heliaspis
    Male
    (Specimen: courtesy of the The Australian Museum)

    The adult moths are dimorphic. The male is brown with deep orange hindwings, and has a wingspan of about 6 cms.

    Chenuala heliaspis
    Female
    (Specimen: courtesy of the The Australian Museum)

    The female is paler and has a wingspan of about 7 cms.

    The species is found in:

  • Queensland,
  • New South Wales,
  • Australian Capital Territory, and
  • Victoria.


    Further reading :

    Ian F.B. Common,
    Moths of Australia,
    Melbourne University Press, 1990, fig 38.13, pl. 13.9, p. 396.

    Pat and Mike Coupar,
    Flying Colours,
    New South Wales University Press, Sydney 1992, p. 29.

    Peter Hendry,
    The Anthelidae,
    Metamorphosis Australia,
    Issue 50 (September 2008), pp 27-31,
    Butterflies and Other Invertebrates Club.

    Peter Marriott,
    Moths of Victoria - Part 1,
    Silk Moths and Allies - BOMBYCOIDEA
    ,
    Entomological Society of Victoria, 2008, pp. 20-21.

    Edward Meyrick,
    Descriptions of Australian Lepidoptera,
    Transactions of the Royal Society of South Australia,
    Volume 14 (1891), p. 192.


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    (updated 26 April 2013, 21 February 2017)