Phaos aglaophara Turner, 1926
Alpine Tiger Moth
(one synonym: Amsacta eurymochla Turner, 1927)
ARCTIINAE,   ARCTIIDAE,   NOCTUOIDEA
  
Don Herbison-Evans
(donherbisonevans@outlook.com)
and
Stella Crossley

Phaos aglaophara
(Specimen : courtesy of A. Kallies, Photo: courtesy of Peter Marriott, Moths of Victoria - Part 2)

These caterpillars are hairy and mostly black, with some brown hairs along the sides in the middle. The caterpillars have been found feeding on plants in the family ASTERACEAE.

Phaos aglaophara
cocoon
(Specimen : courtesy of A. Kallies, Photo: courtesy of Peter Marriott, Moths of Victoria - Part 2)

The pupa is dark brown and formed inside a brown cocoon.

Phaos aglaophara
male
(Photo: courtesy of Peter Marriott, Moths of Victoria - Part 2)

The adult moth males and females are very different. The males fly during the day.

The males have a bold black and yellow pattern on each forewing, except for a broad black margin containing a number of white marks. Each hindwing of the male is yellow with a broad black margin and a central black spot. The wingspan is about 3 cms.

Phaos aglaophara
female
(Specimen : courtesy of A. Kallies, Photo: courtesy of Peter Marriott, Moths of Victoria - Part 2))

The female moth is bulbous, brown, and hairy, with tiny wings, and cannot fly. Its length is about 1.5 cms.

Phaos aglaophara
eggs
(Specimen : courtesy of A. Kallies, Photo: courtesy of Peter Marriott, Moths of Victoria - Part 2))

The eggs are white, smooth, and nearly spherical. They are laid in small clusters on or near the previous cocoon of the female.

The species is found in the mountains of south-eastern Australia, including

  • New South Wales, and
  • Victoria.


    Further reading :

    Ian F.B. Common,
    Moths of Australia,
    Melbourne University Press, 1990, pl 19.17, p. 436.

    Peter Marriott,
    Moths of Victoria - Part 2,
    Tiger Moths and Allies - NOCTUOIDEA (A)
    ,
    Entomological Society of Victoria, 2009, pp. 28-29.

    A. Jefferis Turner,
    Studies in Australian Lepidoptera,
    Transactions of the Royal Society of South Australia,
    Volume 50 (1926), p. 120.


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    (updated 15 November 2009)