Anomis combinans (Walker, [1858])
(also known as Rusicada combinans)
CALPINAE ,   NOCTUIDAE ,   NOCTUOIDEA
 
Don Herbison-Evans
(donherbisonevans@outlook.com)
and
Stella Crossley

Anomis combinans
(Photo: Don Herbison-Evans, Bundaberg, Queensland)

This spectacular Caterpillar is grey with rows of yellow spots along each side edged in black, and a white dorsal line also edged in black.

Anomis combinans
(Photo: courtesy of Jutta Godwin, Cubberla-Witton Catchments Network, Brisbane, Queensland)

It has been found feeding on :

  • Cottonwood ( Hibiscus tiliaceus, MALVACEAE ),
  • Australian Rosella ( Hibiscus heterophyllus, MALVACEAE ), and
  • Sleepy Morning ( Waltheria americana, STERCULIACEAE ).

    Anomis combinans
    (Photo: courtesy of Jutta Godwin, Cubberla-Witton Catchments Network, Brisbane, Queensland)

    The Caterpillar grows to a length of about 4 cms.

    Anomis combinans
    empty pupa in leaf shelter
    (Photo: courtesy of Jutta Godwin, Cubberla-Witton Catchments Network, Brisbane, Queensland)

    It pupates in a curled leaf on the foodplant.

    Anomis combinans
    (Photo: courtesy of the Macleay Museum, University of Sydney)

    The adult moth of this species is dark orange, with a faint brown tracey and a dark mark in the middle of each forewing. The forewing costa is slightly curved to give a slightly hooked wingtip, and the forewing margins are doubly recurved giving a shallow cusp halfway down. The moth has a wing span of about 4 cms.

    Anomis combinans
    (Photo: courtesy of Scott Gavins, Fraser Coast, Queensland)

    The species has been found across south-east Asia, including:

  • Malaysia,
  • Sri Lanka,

    and in Australia in:

  • Queensland, and
  • New South Wales.

    Anomis combinans
    underside
    (Photo: courtesy of Jutta Godwin, Cubberla-Witton Catchments Network, Brisbane, Queensland)


    Further reading :

    Francis Walker,
    Noctuidae,
    List of the Specimens of Lepidopterous Insects in the Collection of the British Museum,
    Part 13 (1858), p. 1001, No. 7.


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    (updated 15 July 2012, 12 April 2016)