Tathorhynchus fallax Swinhoe, 1902
Double-spotted Snout
(also known as Lygephila fallax)
CATOCALINAE,   EREBIDAE,   NOCTUOIDEA
 
Don Herbison-Evans
(donherbisonevans@outlook.com)
and
Stella Crossley


(Photo: courtesy of Donald Hobern, Aranda, Australian Capital Territory)

Overseas, the Caterpillars of the related species Tathorhynchus exsiccata feed on plants in FABACEAE, including

  • True Indigo ( Indigofera tinctoria ),
  • Alfalfa/Lucerne ( Medicago sativa ), and
  • Spanish Broom (Spartium junceum ).


    (Photo: courtesy of Pete Woodall, O’Connor, Australian Capital Territory)

    The adult moth of Tathorhynchus fallax is fawn, with forewings that each have dark margins, and near the middle have a small pale spot joined by dark line to a small pale-outlined kidney-shaped spot. The hindwings are plain fawn. The moth has a wingspan of about 4 cms.


    (Specimen: courtesy of the Macleay Museum, University of Sydney)

    The species may be found over much of Australia, including

  • Northern Territory,
  • Queensland,
  • Norfolk Island,
  • New South Wales,
  • Australian Capital Territory,
  • Victoria,
  • Tasmania,
  • South Australia, and
  • Western Australia,

    as well as in

  • New Zealand.

    Some taxonomists consider it to be a subspecies of Tathorhynchus exsiccata which is found in North America, Africa, Europe, and Asia.


    Further reading :

    Ian F.B. Common,
    Moths of Australia, Melbourne University Press, 1990, fig. 45.1, p. 452.

    Peter Marriott,
    Moths of Victoria - Part 8,
    Night Moths and Allies - NOCTUOIDEA(B)
    ,
    Entomological Society of Victoria, 2017, pp. 12-13.

    Charles Swinhoe,
    On Indian and Australian moths,
    The Annals and Magazine of Natural History,
    Series 7, Volume 9 (1902), pp. 423-424.


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    (updated 6 August 2011, 8 October 2018)