Pterocyclophora huntei Warren, 1903
(one synonym is Pterocyclophora pratti Druce, 1909)
CATOCALINAE,   EREBIDAE,   NOCTUOIDEA
 
Don Herbison-Evans
(donherbisonevans@outlook.com)
and
Stella Crossley

Pterocyclophora huntei
male
(Photo: courtesy of CSIRO/BIO Photography Group, Centre for Biodiversity Genomics, University of Guelph)

The adult moth has variable patchy brown forewings, each having two dark lines from the costa, and a dark-edged pale or dark area along the margin. The hindwings are yellow, with a dark-edged pale or dark area along the margin. The forewings have hooked wing-tips, and each wing has a serated margin. One of the serrations on the each hindwing margin is elongated into a tail. The wingspan of the female is about 8 cms. The wingspan of the male is about 7 cms.

Pterocyclophora huntei
female, drawing by George Francis Hampson,
,
Catalogue of Lepidoptera Phalænæ in the British Museum,
Noctuidæ, Volume XII (1913), Plate CCXVI, figure 10,
image courtesy of Biodiversity Heritage Library, digitized by Ernst Mayr Library, Harvard University.

The species has been found in

  • New Guinea,
  • Seram,
  • Solomons,

    as well as in Australia in

  • Queensland.

    Pterocyclophora huntei
    male, drawing by George Francis Hampson,
    ,
    Catalogue of Lepidoptera Phalænæ in the British Museum,
    Noctuidæ, Volume XII (1913), Plate CCXVI, figure 9,
    image courtesy of Biodiversity Heritage Library, digitized by Ernst Mayr Library, Harvard University.


    Herbert Druce,
    Descriptions of three new species of Heterocera from Dutch New Guinea,
    Annals and magazine of natural history; zoology, botany, and geology,
    Series 8, Part 3 (1909), p. 348.

    George Francis Hampson,
    Catalogue of Noctuidae in the British Museum,
    Catalogue of Lepidoptera Phalaenae in the British Museum,
    Volume 12 (1913), p. 468, No. 7504, and also Plate 116, figs. 9 & 10.

    William Warren,
    New moths from British New Guinea,
    Novitates Zoologicae,
    Volume 10 (1903), p. 122.


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    (written 28 May 2019)