Anomis involuta (Walker, [1858])
(one synonym : Gonitis vitiensis Butler, 1886)
CATOCALINAE ,   NOCTUIDAE ,   NOCTUOIDEA
 
Don Herbison-Evans
(donherbisonevans@outlook.com)
and
Stella Crossley

Anomis involuta
(Photo: courtesy of Kell Nielsen, Gold Coast)

This caterpillar is mainly green, with black spots, and a pale brown head. It has reduced prolegs, and progresses in a looper fashion.

Anomis involuta
(Photo: courtesy of Kell Nielsen, Gold Coast)

It is a pest on :

  • Jute ( Corchorus, MALVACEAE ),

    and has also been found feeding on :

  • Cottonwood ( Hibiscus tiliaceus, MALVACEAE ), and
  • Brown kurrajong ( Commersonia bartramia, STERCULIACEAE ).

    Anomis involuta
    (Photo: courtesy of Kell Nielsen, Gold Coast)

    The Caterpillar grows to a length of about 3 cms.

    Anomis involuta
    leaves parted to show caterpillar about to pupate, constructing its cocoon
    (Photo: courtesy of Kell Nielsen, Gold Coast)

    It pupates in a sparse cocoon between a pair of leaves on the foodplant.

    Anomis involuta
    (Photo: courtesy of Kell Nielsen, Gold Coast)

    The adult moth of this species is brown with a variable pale sinuous pattern and a central white spot on each forewing.

    Anomis involuta
    (Photo: courtesy of Kell Nielsen, Gold Coast)

    The moths have a wing span of about 4 cms.

    Anomis involuta
    underside
    (Photo: courtesy of Graeme Cocks, Townsville)

    The species occurs in south-east Asia and the south Pacific, including:

  • Cook Islands,
  • Hong Kong,
  • Japan,
  • Korea,
  • Society Island,

    as well as in Australia in

  • Western Australia,
  • Northern Territory,
  • Queensland,
  • New South Wales, and
  • Norfolk Island.

    Anomis involuta
    (Photo: courtesy of Kell Nielsen, Gold Coast)


    Further reading :

    Ian F.B. Common,
    Moths of Australia, Melbourne University Press, 1990, fig. 44.14, p. 449.


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    (created 6 February 2010, updated 30 June 2012)