Donuca lanipes (Butler, 1877)
(previously known as Calliodes lanipes)
CATOCALINAE,   NOCTUIDAE,   NOCTUOIDEA
 
Don Herbison-Evans
(donherbisonevans@outlook.com)
and
Stella Crossley


(Photo: courtesy of Ian McMillan, Imbil, Queensland)

This adult moth has a dark subtle pattern, including scalloped markings along the margins, an eyespot on each forewing, and with a bold diagonal white line across each wing. The wingspan is about 6 cms.

The resting posture has the white lines on all four wings aligned to look like a smiling mouth of a monster with a pair of eyes above and a row of teeth below Curiously: the moth often likes to face downwards when resting, which rather interferes with the monster illusion.


(Photo: courtesy of Scott Gavins, Fraser Coast, Queensland)

The species is found over the north-east quarter of Australia, including:

  • Northern Territory,
  • Queensland, and
  • New South Wales.


    underside
    (Photo: courtesy of Trevor Jinks, North Burnett, Queensland)


    Further reading :

    Arthur G. Butler,
    Descriptions of Three Lepidopterous Insects from Queensland,
    Entomologist's Monthly Magazine,
    Volume 14 (1877), pp. 109-110.

    Ian F.B. Common,
    Moths of Australia,
    Melbourne University Press, 1990, p. 454.

    Peter Hendry,
    At the Light Trap: Records of daytime flying moths (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae: Agaristinae) and the genus Donuca (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae: Catocalinae),
    Metamorphosis Australia,
    Issue 55 (December 2009), pp. 24-27,
    Butterflies and Other Invertebrates Club.

    Buck Richardson,
    Tropical Queensland Wildlife from Dusk to Dawn Science and Art,
    LeapFrogOz, Kuranda, 2015, p. 132.


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    (updated 22 March 2013)