Arsacia rectalis (Walker, 1863)
Synonyms:
(Arsacia saturatalis Walker, 1966)
(Notocyma pruinosa Snellen, 1872)
(Arsacia frontirufa Swinhoe, 1885)
(Amblyzancla declivis Turner, 1936)
CATOCALINAE,   EREBIDAE,   NOCTUOIDEA
 
Don Herbison-Evans
(donherbisonevans@outlook.com)
and
Stella Crossley

Arsacia rectalis
(Photo: courtesy of Pornthap Kerkig)

The Caterpillar of this species is pale green, cylindrical, and has a complete set of prolegs. The caterpillar normally lives in a shelter formed by joining two leaves with silk. The caterpillar has been found feeding on

  • Rosewood ( Dalbergia species, FABACEAE ).

    The caterpillar pupates in a loose cocoon covered in detritus.

    Arsacia rectalis
    (Photo: courtesy of CSIRO/BIO Photography Group, Centre for Biodiversity Genomics, University of Guelph)

    The adult moth has variable patchy brown forewings, each with a pale-edged diagonal slightly serrated line connecting to a pale triangle near the middle of the hind-margin. The hindwings are pale grey, fading to off-white at the bases. Each forewing costa has a convex elbow. The wingspan is about 2 cms.

    Arsacia rectalis
    drawing by Charles Swinhoe, listed as Arsacia frontirufa
    ,
    Proceedings of the Zoological Society of London, 1885, Plate XX, fig. 12,
    image courtesy of Biodiversity Heritage Library,
    digitized by Natural History Museum Library, London.

    The species has been found in

  • Borneo,
  • India, and
  • Solomons,

    as well as in Australia in

  • Queensland.

    Arsacia rectalis
    showing undersides
    (Photo: courtesy of the Photography Group, Centre for Biodiversity Genomics, University of Guelph)


    Further reading :

    Charles Swinhoe,
    On the Lepidoptera of Bombay and the Deccan,
    Proceedings of the Zoological Society of London,
    1885, p. 301, No. 102, and also Plate 20, fig. 12.

    A. Jefferis Turner,
    New Australian Lepidoptera,
    Proceedings of the Royal Society of Queensland,
    Volume 47 (1936), p. 34.

    Francis Walker,
    Crambites & Tortricites,
    List of the Specimens of Lepidopterous Insects in the Collection of the British Museum,
    Part 27 (1863), pp. 21-22, No. 1.


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    (written 24 May 2019)