Maurilia iconica (Walker, 1857)
(one synonym : Briardia cervina Walker, 1866)
CHLOEPHORINAE ,   NOLIDAE ,   NOCTUOIDEA ,  
  
Don Herbison-Evans
(donherbisonevans@outlook.com)
and
Stella Crossley

Maurilia iconica
male
(Photo: courtesy of Buck Richardson, Kuranda, Queensland)

The Caterpillars of this species have a bulging thorax. They are brown with thin broken white lines along the body The caterpillars have been found feeding on :

  • Dhaora ( Anogeissus, COMBRETACEAE ),
  • Indian Almond ( Terminalia catappa, COMBRETACEAE ),
  • Resak ( Vatica, DIPTEROCARPACEAE ),
  • Meranti ( Shorea, DIPTEROCARPACEAE ),
  • Sugar Cane ( Saccharum, POACEAE ), and
  • Teak ( Tectona, VERBENACEAE ).

    The caterpillars pupate in cocoon spun in a curled leaf.

    Maurilia iconica
    female
    (Photo: courtesy of Graeme Cocks, Townsville, Queensland)

    The adult moths are dimorphic. The females are plain brown with faint dark zigzag lines across the forewings. The males have a large irregular orange spot outlined in dark brown on the costa of each forewing. The wingspan is about 3 cms.

    The species is found from south-east Asia to the south Pacific, including

  • Borneo,
  • Fiji,
  • Hong Kong,
  • Japan,
  • Sri Lanka,

    and also in Australia in:

  • Queensland.


    Further reading :

    Ian F.B. Common,
    Moths of Australia,
    Melbourne University Press, 1990, fig. 48.5, p. 458.

    Buck Richardson,
    Tropical Queensland Wildlife from Dusk to Dawn Science and Art,
    LeapFrogOz, Kuranda, 2015, p. 169.

    Francis Walker,
    Noctuidae,
    List of the Specimens of Lepidopterous Insects in the Collection of the British Museum,
    Part 13 (1858), pp. 992-993, No. 14.

    Paul Zborowski and Ted Edwards,
    A Guide to Australian Moths,
    CSIRO Publishing, 2007, p. 187.


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    (updated 13 November 2010)