Dissomorphia australiaria (Guenée, 1857)
(one synonym : Macaria remotaria Walker, 186l)
Dashed Geometrid
MACARIINI ,   ENNOMINAE ,   GEOMETRIDAE ,   GEOMETROIDEA
 
Don Herbison-Evans
(donherbisonevans@outlook.com)
and
Peter Marriott & Stella Crossley

Dissomorphia australiaria
(Photo: courtesy of Catherine J. Young)

These Caterpillars are loopers, having most prolegs missing. Initially they are a dirty pale greenish-brown with pale lines on the body, and have a brown head. They have been found in Melbourne in January feeding on:

  • Silver Wattle ( Acacia dealbata, MIMOSACEAE ).

    Dissomorphia australiaria
    (Photo: courtesy of Catherine J. Young)

    Later instars are a brighter green with white lines and have a green head. The Caterpillars typically rest at the tip of a branch where the green and white markings and slightly gnarled body match the foliage. They grow to a length of about 2.5 cms.

    Dissomorphia australiaria
    Male
    (Photo: courtesy of Merlin Crossley, Melbourne, Victoria)

    The adult can emerge after as little as nine days. The adult moths are dimorphic. The males are pinkish brown, with brown markings including a chestnut brown spot in the middle of each forewing.

    Dissomorphia australiaria
    Female
    (Photo: copyright Peter Marriott)

    The female has more scalloped wings, and has an interesting silver white pattern underneath the wings. The wingspan is about 3 cms.

    Dissomorphia australiaria
    Female underside
    (Photo: copyright Peter Marriott)

    The eggs are pale green and laid singly. They are oval and look squashed, and have a finely dimpled surface.

    Dissomorphia australiaria
    (Photo: courtesy of Catherine J. Young)

    The species has been found in:

  • Queensland,
  • New South Wales,
  • Australian Capital Territory,
  • Victoria, and
  • Tasmania.

    Dissomorphia australiaria
    head, female
    (Photo: courtesy of Laura Levens, Upper Beaconsfield, Victoria)


    Further reading :

    Achille Guenée,
    Uranides et Phalénites,
    in Boisduval & Guenée: Histoire naturelle des insectes; spécies général des lépidoptères,
    Volume 9, Part 10 (1857), pp. 91-92, No. 1065.

    Marilyn Hewish,
    Moths of Victoria: Part 7,
    Bark Moths and Allies - GEOMETROIDEA (D)
    ,
    Entomological Society of Victoria, 2016, pp. 6-7, 16-17.


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    (updated 24 July 2013)