Proboloptera embolias Meyrick, 1892
GONODONTINI,   ENNOMINAE,   GEOMETRIDAE,   GEOMETROIDEA
 
Don Herbison-Evans
(donherbisonevans@outlook.com)
and
Stella Crossley


male, resting with wings separated
(Photo: courtesy of Marilyn Hewish, Moths of Victoria: Part 7)

The wings of the adult moths of this species vary in colour from grey to rusty brown. The wings each have incomplete angular dark lines dividing the basal, central, and marginal thirds, each of which shade continuously. The forewings each have a pale patch extending from middle of the hind margin. The male has a dark angular spot near the middle of each wing. The margin of each hindwing has a large triangular bulge with sinuous edges. The wingspan is about 3 cms.


female
(Photo: courtesy of Marilyn Hewish, Moths of Victoria: Part 7)

The moths rest the wings held flat. Sometimes the forewings are held separate from the hindwings, but with a crease in each forewing. The creases partly obscure the central dark spots on the forewings. Sometimes the moths rest with the forewings overlapping the hindwings so that their patterns align, and with no creases in the forewings.


underside, male
(Photo: courtesy of David Mules, Moths of Victoria: Part 7)

The undersides are similar to the upper surfaces, with more exaggerated colours and patterns, sometimes with the addition of a submarginal sinuous white lines.


underside, female, digitally repaired,
(Photo: courtesy of Ken Harris)

The species occurs in Australia in

  • New South Wales, and
  • Victoria.


    male, resting with wings overlapping
    (Photo: courtesy of David Mules, Moths of Victoria: Part 7)


    Further reading :

    Marilyn Hewish,
    Moths of Victoria: Part 7,
    Bark Moths and Allies - GEOMETROIDEA (A)
    ,
    Entomological Society of Victoria, update 58 (2017).

    Edward Meyrick,
    Revison of Australian Lepidoptera V,
    Proceedings of the Linnean Society of New South Wales,
    Volume 16, Part 4 (1892), pp. 641-642, No. 69.


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    (written 26 September 2017)