Anisozyga insperata (Walker, 1861)
Lacy Emerald
(previously known as Eucyclodes insperata)
GEOMETRINAE ,   GEOMETRIDAE ,   GEOMETROIDEA
 
Don Herbison-Evans
(donherbisonevans@outlook.com)
and
Stella Crossley

The typical Caterpillar features are obscured in this animal by spiky extensions to its body: it looks as though it is clothed in armour. The whole body surface is covered with small hard round bumps. Large spikes extend sideways on abdominal segments 1 to 5, the first of these extending into a horizontal flange around the head and thorax. Its colour pattern is various shades of brown, with some cream lines and patches, and some light green patches at the bases of the larger spikes. It feeds on:

  • Exocarpus ( SANTALACEAE ),
  • Guava ( Psidium guajava, MYRTACEAE ), and
  • Angophora ( MYRTACEAE ).

    The Caterpillars take only about 20 days to reach pupation. They grow to a length of about 2 cms.

    The pupal duration is about 26 days in summer in Melbourne.


    female
    (Photo: courtesy of Merlin Crossley, Melbourne, Victoria)

    The female and male moths differ. The female is green with wavy white and yellow borders to the wings. She has a wing span of about 3 cms.


    male
    (Photo: courtesy of Evan Harris, Ipswich, Queensland)

    The male is also basically green, with a lacy white pattern. The male is slightly smaller than the female, having a wingspan of about 2.5 cms. The adults may be distinguished from those of some other species in this genus as the hind wings have a plain curved edge, with no scalloping.


    male
    (Photo: courtesy of Brenda and Barry Martin, Pambula, New South Wales)

    Eggs hatch after about 20 days in summer in Melbourne.


    male underside
    (Photo: courtesy of Brenda and Barry Martin, Pambula, New South Wales)

    The species is found over much of Australia, including :

  • Queensland,
  • New South Wales,
  • Victoria, and
  • Tasmania.


    female underside
    (Photo: courtesy of Ian McMillan, Imbil, Queensland)


    Further reading :

    Ian F.B. Common,
    Moths of Australia,
    Melbourne University Press, 1990, pls. 11.17, 11.18, p. 373.

    Peter Hendry,
    At the light trap,
    Butterflies and Other Invertebrates Club,
    Newsletter Issue 45 (June 2007), pp. 18-22.

    Peter Marriott,
    Moths of Victoria: Part 4,
    Emeralds and Allies - GEOMETROIDEA (B)
    ,
    Entomological Society of Victoria, 2012, pp. 32-33.

    Francis Walker,
    Geometrites,
    List of the Specimens of Lepidopterous Insects in the Collection of the British Museum,
    Part 22 (1861), p. 555, No. 21.


    previous
    back
    caterpillar
    Australian
    Australian Butterflies
    butterflies
    Australian
    home
    caterpillars
    Australian
    Australian Moths
    moths
    next
    next
    caterpillar

    (updated 29 June 2013, 18 October 2014)