Chlorocoma melocrossa Meyrick, 1888
Cream-fringed Emerald
GEOMETRINAE,   GEOMETRIDAE,   GEOMETROIDEA
 
Don Herbison-Evans
(donherbisonevans@outlook.com)
and
Stella Crossley

Chlorocoma melocrossa
(Photo: courtesy of Merlin Crossley, Melbourne, Victoria)

This Caterpillar is thin and green, with the head end extended into two red horn-like points. A pale yellow lateral line extends from behind these points to the anal prolegs. A red spot marks each ventral prolegs.

Chlorocoma melocrossa
close-up of head end
(Photo: courtesy of Merlin Crossley, Melbourne, Victoria)

It typically stands twig-like on its anal prolegs and single pair of ventral prolegs. It blends in well with the stalks of its foodplant. It feeds on various Wattles ( MIMOSACEAE ).

Pupation occurs in the leaf litter. Pupal duration is three weeks for Caterpillars pupating in December in Melbourne.

Chlorocoma melocrossa
(Photo: courtesy of Peter Marriott, Moths of Victoria: Part 4)

The adult is also green, and has two faint white zig-zag lines across each wing. The termen of each wing and the costa of each forewing are pale orange. Because of the predominant green colour, this and related species of moths are called 'Emeralds'. The moth has a wingspan of about 3 cms.

The eggs are bright green also. They are oval like a rugby football, slightly flattened above and below and at each end.

The species is found in :

  • Queensland,
  • New South Wales,
  • Victoria,
  • Tasmania,
  • South Australia, and
  • Western Australia.


    Further reading :

    Peter Marriott,
    Moths of Victoria: Part 4,
    Emeralds and Allies - GEOMETROIDEA (B)
    ,
    Entomological Society of Victoria, 2012, pp. 34-35.

    Edward Meyrick,
    Revision of Australian Lepidoptera. II,
    Proceedings of the Linnean Society of New South Wales,
    Series 2, Volume 2, Part 4 (1888), p. 879, No. 49.


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    (updated 4 July 2013)