Prasinocyma semicrocea (Walker, 1861)
Common Gum Emerald
(one synonym : Iodis semicrocea Lucas, 1888)
GEOMETRINAE,   GEOMETRIDAE,   GEOMETROIDEA
 
Don Herbison-Evans
(donherbisonevans@outlook.com)
and
Stella Crossley


(Photo: courtesy of Steve Williams, Moths of Victoria: Part 4)

The Caterpillars of this species are thin green loopers. Later instars develop a reddish dorsal surface.


(Photo: courtesy of Steve Williams, Moths of Victoria: Part 4)

The head and tail each have a slight crest. The head can be lifted back, or flexed forward to face the feet. The caterpillars can feed on the foliage of

  • Wattles ( Acacia species, MIMOSACEAE ) or
  • Gum Trees ( Eucalyptus species, MYRTACEAE ).


    recently vacated pupa
    (Photo: courtesy of Steve Williams, Moths of Victoria: Part 4)

    The pupa is formed in a loose cocoon in the ground debris.


    (Specimen: courtesy of Peter Marriott, Moths of Victoria: Part 4)

    The adult moth has green wings, with two faint pale zigzag lines across each forewing, and one across each hindwing. The edges of each of the wings are brown. There is a slight cusp on the margin of each hindwing. The moths have a wingspan of about 2.5 cms.


    (Specimen: courtesy of Peter Marriott, Moths of Victoria: Part 4)

    The eggs are oval and pale green, and covered in minute pits.


    egg, magnified
    (Photo: courtesy of Steve Williams, Moths of Victoria: Part 4)

    The species has been found in Australia in :

  • Queensland,
  • New South Wales,
  • Austraian Capital Territory,
  • Victoria,
  • Tasmania,
  • South Australia, and
  • Western Australia.

    The genera Prasinocyma and Iodis are inappropriate for this species, but no suitable genus has yet been named and described for it.


    Further reading :

    Peter Marriott,
    Moths of Victoria: Part 4,
    Emeralds and Allies - GEOMETROIDEA (B)
    ,
    Entomological Society of Victoria, 2012, pp. 32-33.

    Francis Walker,
    Geometrites,
    List of the Specimens of Lepidopterous Insects in the Collection of the British Museum,
    Part 22 (1861), pp. 528-529, No. 40.


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    (written 25 April 2014, 20 January 2016)