Chlorocoma tetraspila (Lower, 1901)
Four-spotted Emerald
(previously known as Euchloris tetraspila)
GEOMETRINAE ,   GEOMETRIDAE ,   GEOMETROIDEA
 
Don Herbison-Evans
(donherbisonevans@outlook.com)
and
Peter Marriott & Cathy Young
and
Stella Crossley


early instar
(Photo: copyright Cathy Young)

When young, these Caterpillars are slim reddish-green loopers with a nobbly head and tail.


late instar
(Photo: copyright Cathy Young)

Later on they get a pointed head and red prolegs and claspers. The caterpillars have been found feeding on:

  • Common Aotus ( Aotus ericoides, FABACEAE ).


    close-up of prolegs and claspers of late instar
    (Photo: copyright Cathy Young)

    The wings of the adult moths of this species are green, making the species a member of the 'Emeralds'. Each wing has a red spot in the middle. The forewings each have an orange costa.


    female
    (Photo: copyright Cathy Young)

    The forewings have recurved margins, and the hindwings each have a definite cusp on the margin, which make it easy to distinguish from the related Emerald Chlorocoma cadmaria.


    male
    (Photo: copyright Cathy Young)

    All four wings have a faint pale wavy line across them, and also have a dark reddish spot in the middle. unlike those of the Emerald Chlorocoma vertumnaria. The moths have a wing span of about 2 cms.

               
    female
         
          male
    (Photos of disembodied moths: copyright Peter Marriott)

    The eggs are pale green, smooth, and ellipsoidal, although they collapse somewhat during development. They are laid singly.


    eggs, magnified
    (Photo: copyright Cathy Young)

    The species has been found in

  • Queensland,
  • New South Wales,
  • Victoria, and
  • Tasmania.


    Further reading :

    Oswald B. Lower,
    Revision of the Australian Hesperiadae,
    Transactions of the Royal Society of South Australia,
    Volume 25 (1901), p. 66.

    Peter Marriott,
    Moths of Victoria: Part 4,
    Emeralds and Allies - GEOMETROIDEA (B)
    ,
    Entomological Society of Victoria, 2012, pp. 34-35.


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    (updated 29 June 2013, 11 June 2014)