Aenetus astathes (Lower, 1892)
(formerly known as Charagia astathes)
HEPIALIDAE,   HEPIALOIDEA
 
Don Herbison-Evans
(donherbisonevans@outlook.com)
and
Stella Crossley

Aenetus astathes
female
(Photo: courtesy of CSIRO/BIO Photography Group, Centre for Biodiversity Genomics, University of Guelph)

The Caterpillars of this species bore into the stems of trees, particularly trees in FABACEAE.

The female adult moths have green forewings, each with a brown submarginal band, and brown areas along the costa and the hind-margin. The females have orange hind wings. The female moths have a wingspan of up to 7 cms.

Aenetus astathes
male
(Photo: courtesy of CSIRO/BIO Photography Group, Centre for Biodiversity Genomics, University of Guelph)

The male adult moths have pale green or brown forewings, each with two narrow dark-edged white lines forming a large 'V' shape. The forewings each have a bulge on the costa near the wingtip. The hindwings of the males are white. The male moths have a wingspan of about 4 cms.

The species is found in

  • Western Australia


    Further reading :

    Oswald B. Lower,
    Descriptions of New South Australian Lepidoptera,
    Transactions of the Royal Society of South Australia,
    Volume 15 (1892), p. 5.

    Thomas J. Simonsen,
    Splendid Ghost Moths and their Allies,
    A Revision of Australian Abantiades, Oncopera, Aenetus, Archaeoaenetus and Zelotypia (Hepialidae),
    Monographs on Australian Lepidoptera Volume 12,
    CSIRO Publishing, Melbourne, 2018, pp. 139-140, pp. 46, 51, 123-126, 132-133, 205, 224, 243, Plate 24: figs. G and H.


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    (written 20 March 2019)