Abantiades magnificus (T.P. Lucas, 1898)
(previously known as Pielus magnificus)
Magnificent Ghost Moth
HEPIALIDAE,   HEPIALOIDEA
 
Don Herbison-Evans
(donherbisonevans@outlook.com)
and
Stella Crossley

Abantiades magnificus
(Photo: courtesy of the Photography Group, Centre for Biodiversity Genomics, University of Guelph)

The adult moths of this species have grey-brown forewings, each with two black-edged silver flashes. The hindwings are plain grey-brown, fading to pale orange-brown at the bases.

Abantiades magnificus
(Photo: by Chriss Short, Wisemans Ferry, New South Wales, courtesy of Steven Dodge)

The moths have unipectinate antennae. The wingspan is about 12 cms.

Abantiades magnificus
(Photo: by Chriss Short, Wisemans Ferry, New South Wales, courtesy of Steven Dodge)

The species is found in

  • New South Wales,
  • Australian Capital Territory, and
  • Victoria.

    Abantiades magnificus
    (Photo: courtesy of the Photography Group, Centre for Biodiversity Genomics, University of Guelph)


    Further reading :

    Ian F.B. Common,
    Moths of Australia, Melbourne University Press, 1990, fig. 17.6, p. 150.

    Axel Kallies,
    Moths of Victoria - Part 6,
    Ghost Moths - HEPIALIDAE and Allies
    ,
    Entomological Society of Victoria, 2015, pp. 24-25.

    Thomas P. Lucas,
    Descriptions of Queensland Lepidoptera,
    Proceedings of the Royal Society of Queensland,
    Volume 13 (1892), pp. 61-62.

    Thomas J. Simonsen,
    Splendid Ghost Moths and their Allies,
    A Revision of Australian Abantiades, Oncopera, Aenetus, Archaeoaenetus and Zelotypia (Hepialidae),
    Monographs on Australian Lepidoptera Volume 12,
    CSIRO Publishing, Melbourne, 2018, pp. 83, 84, 85, Plate 13.


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    (updated 23 May 2010, 12 March 2019)