Aenetus mirabilis (Rothschild, 1894)
(previously known as Oenetus mirabilis)
HEPIALIDAE ,   HEPIALOIDEA
 
Don Herbison-Evans
(donherbisonevans@outlook.com)
and
Stella Crossley

Aenetus mirabilis
male
(Photo: courtesy of David Rentz, Kuranda, Queensland)

These Caterpillars have been found boring into the trunks of :

  • Red Ash ( Alphitonia excelsa, RHAMNACEAE ).

    Aenetus mirabilis
    male
    (Photo: courtesy of David Rentz, Kuranda, Queensland)

    The male adult moths have blue-green forewings and white hindwings. The males have a set of brown hairs at the base of the wings that emit a pheromone. Some humans can smell this, and some cannot.

    Aenetus mirabilis
    female
    (Photo: courtesy of David Rentz, Kuranda, Queensland)

    The females have brownish green forewings and yellow hindwings. The moths often have a wingspan exceeding 10 cms.

    Aenetus mirabilis
    female
    (Picture: courtesy of Shell Australia)

    The eggs are spherical, and initially white. They are laid in random piles.

    Aenetus mirabilis
    eggs
    Photo: courtesy of Buck Richardson, from
    Tropical Queensland Wildlife from Dusk to Dawn Science and Art

    The species is found in

  • Queensland.


    Further reading :

    Ian F.B. Common,
    Moths of Australia,
    Melbourne University Press, 1990, pls, 2.1, 2.9, pp. 46, 148.

    Buck Richardson,
    Tropical Queensland Wildlife from Dusk to Dawn Science and Art,
    LeapFrogOz, Kuranda, 2015, pp. 94-95.

    Lionel Walter Rothschild,
    On a new species of the Hepialid genus Oenetus,
    Annals and Magazine of Natural History,
    Series 6, Volume 13 (1894), p. 440.

    Paul Zborowski and Ted Edwards,
    A Guide to Australian Moths,
    CSIRO Publishing, 2007, p. 41.


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    (updated 24 November 2011)