Aenetus mirabilis (Rothschild, 1894)
(previously known as : Oenetus mirabilis)
HEPIALIDAE ,   HEPIALOIDEA
 
Don Herbison-Evans
( donherbisonevans@outlook.com)
and
Stella Crossley

Aenetus mirabilis
male
(Photo: courtesy of David Rentz, Kuranda)

These Caterpillars have been found boring into the trunks of :

  • Red Ash ( Alphitonia excelsa, RHAMNACEAE ).

    Aenetus mirabilis
    male
    (Photo: courtesy of David Rentz, Kuranda)

    The male adult moths have blue-green forewings and white hindwings. The males have a set of brown hairs at the base of the wings that emit a pheromone. Some humans can smell this, and some cannot.

    Aenetus mirabilis
    female
    (Photo: courtesy of David Rentz, Kuranda)

    The females have brownish green forewings and yellow hindwings. The moths often have a wingspan exceeding 10 cms.

    Aenetus mirabilis
    female
    (Picture: courtesy of Shell Australia)

    The species is found in

  • Queensland.


    Further reading :

    Ian F.B. Common,
    Moths of Australia, Melbourne University Press, 1990, pls, 2.1, 2.9, pp. 46, 148.

    Paul Zborowski and Ted Edwards,
    A Guide to Australian Moths, CSIRO Publishing, 2007, p. 41.


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    (updated 24 November 2011)