Trapezites maheta (Hewitson, 1877)
Northern Silver Ochre
(previously known as Hesperia maheta)
TRAPEZITINAE ,   HESPERIIDAE ,   HESPERIOIDEA
 
Don Herbison-Evans
(donherbisonevans@outlook.com)
and
Stella Crossley

The Caterpillar of this species is pinkish green, with prominent dark lines along the body. The head has a depression, and is brown edged with black. The caterpillar feeds on various types of Mat-rush ( ASPARAGACEAE ) such as :

  • Riverine Mat-rush ( Lomandra hystrix ), and
  • Many-flowerd Mat-rush ( Lomandra multiflora ),

    and lives in a shelter at the base of a clump of the foodplant. The caterpillar grows to a length of about 2.5 cms.

    The pupa has a length of about 2 cms. It is pale brown with dark spots, and a black patch on the thorax. The pupa is covered in a white waxy powder.


    (Specimen: courtesy of the Macleay Museum, University of Sydney)

    The adult male and female butterflies are very similar, except the wings of the female are more rounded. The wings of both sexes are dark brown with a series of translucent pale yellow spots and patches on each forewing. The hind wings each have a central broad orange band.


    underside
    (Specimen: courtesy of the Macleay Museum, University of Sydney)

    Underneath, the wings are paler brown with white patches. The white patches on the hindwings are lustrous and outlined in black. The wing span is about 3 cms.

    The male adults of this species are well-known for congregating around hilltops. The species occurs in

  • Queensland,
  • New South Wales, and
  • Victoria.


    Further reading :

    Michael F. Braby,
    Butterflies of Australia, CSIRO Publishing, Melbourne 2000, vol. 1, pp 95-96.

    William Chapman Hewitson,
    Descriptions of twenty-three new species of Hesperidae,
    4 19: 76-85 [80]. Annals and Magazine of Natural History,
    Series 4, Volume 19 (1877), p. 80.


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    (updated 18 November 2009, 26 September 2013)