Imma acosma (Turner, 1900)
(formerly known as Pseudotortrix acosma)
IMMIDAE ,   IMMOIDEA
 
Don Herbison-Evans
(donherbisonevans@outlook.com)
and
Stella Crossley


(Photo: courtesy of CSIRO/BIO Photography Group, Centre for Biodiversity Genomics, University of Guelph)

The Caterpillars of this species are green with dark speckles. The caterpillars have sparse hairs, and the abdomen tapers toward the tail. The caterpillars feed openly by day on:

  • Tree Violet ( Hymenanthera dentata, VIOLACEAE ).

    Pupation occurs in a white silk cocoon, probably in the leaf litter.

    The adult moths have brown forewings each with a variable pattern, sometimes with a dark dot near the middle and a vague pale broken transverse band, and patches of orange, pale brown and dark brown. The hindwings are greyer, fading at the bases. The forewings each have a slightly convex costa, and a slightly concave margin. The wingspan is about 2 cms.

    This species has been found in :

  • Queensland, and
  • New South Wales.


    Further reading :

    Ian F.B. Common,
    Moths of Australia,
    Melbourne University Press, 1990, figs. 29.13, 53.1, p. 312.

    Ian F.B. Common,
    The Larvae and Pupae of Imma acosma (Turner) and I. vaticina Meyrick (LEPIDOPTERA: IMMIDAE), and the Taxonomic Relationships of the Family,
    Australian Journal of Entomology,
    Volume 18 Issue 1 (1979), pp. 33-38.

    Paul Zborowski and Ted Edwards,
    A Guide to Australian Moths,
    CSIRO Publishing, 2007, p. 117.

    A. Jefferis Turner,
    New Micro-lepidoptera mostly from Queensland,
    Transactions of the Royal Society of South Australia,
    Volume 24 (1900), p. 16.


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    (updated 25 December 2012, 3 March 2017)