Chloroclystis testulata (Guenée, 1857)
Pome Looper
(also known as Pasiphilodes testulata)
EUPITHECIINI,   LARENTIINAE,   GEOMETRIDAE,   GEOMETROIDEA
 
Don Herbison-Evans
(donherbisonevans@outlook.com)
and
Stella Crossley

Chloroclystis testulata
young instars
(Photo: courtesy of Steve Williams, Moths of Victoria: Part 3)

These caterpillars have been found feeding on

  • the young fruit of Apples ( ROSACEAE ), and
  • the flowers of Wattles ( MIMOSACEAE ).

    Chloroclystis testulata
    later instar
    (Photo: courtesy of Steve Williams, Moths of Victoria: Part 3)

    On Wattle: the caterpillars initially are yellowish brown, which provides them with great camouflage amongst the Wattle flowers.

    Chloroclystis testulata
    later instar
    (Photo: courtesy of Steve Williams, Moths of Victoria: Part 3)

    Later caterpillars develop a pale edged dark line along the back.

    Chloroclystis testulata
    dark form
    (Photo: courtesy of Joan Fearn, Moruya, New South Wales)

    The adult moth is a variable grey or brown, sometimes with a broad pale band across each wing.

    Chloroclystis testulata
    pale band form
    (Photo: courtesy of Donald Hobern, Aranda, Australian Capital Territory)

    The wingspan is about 2 cms.

    Chloroclystis testulata
    chestnut-coloured form
    (Photo: courtesy of Peter Marriott, Moths of Victoria: Part 3)

    The eggs are oval, pale brown, and laid separately.

    Chloroclystis testulata
    eggs magnified
    (Photo: courtesy of Steve Williams, Moths of Victoria: Part 3)

    The species has been found in :

  • New Zealand,

    as well as in Australia in

  • Norfolk Island,
  • New South Wales,
  • Australian Capital Territory,
  • Victoria,
  • Tasmania,
  • South Australia, and
  • Western Australia.

    Chloroclystis testulata
    underside
    (Photo: copyright of Brett and Marie Smith, Ellura Sanctuary, South Australia)


    Further reading :

    Ian F.B. Common,
    Moths of Australia,
    Melbourne University Press, 1990, pp. 67, 377.

    Achille Guenée,
    Uranides et Phalénites,
    in Boisduval & Guenée:
    Histoire naturelle des insectes; spécies général des lépidoptères,
    Volume 9, Part 10 (1857), p. 352, No. 1471.

    Peter Marriott,
    Moths of Victoria: Part 3,
    Waves & Carpets - GEOMETROIDEA (C)
    ,
    Entomological Society of Victoria, 2011, pp. 30-31.


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    (updated 26 February 2013, 8 June 2018)