Entometa chlorosacca Turner, 1924
Green Purse Gum Snout Moth
(previously known as Lebeda apicalis)
LASIOCAMPINAE,   LASIOCAMPIDAE,   BOMBYCOIDEA
 
Don Herbison-Evans
(donherbisonevans@outlook.com)
and
Stella Crossley

Entometa chlorosacca
cocoon
(Photo: courtesy of Peter Marriott, Moths of Victoria - Part 1)

The species is unusual as the Caterpillar uses green silk to make its cocoon, which it hangs from a twig of the foodplant.

Entometa chlorosacca
male
(Photo: courtesy of Peter Marriott, Moths of Victoria - Part 1)

The adult moths have brown wings with faint darker markings, including a darker spot near the centre of each forewing. The hindwings tend to orange.

Entometa chlorosacca
female
(Photo: courtesy of Peter Marriott, Moths of Victoria - Part 1)

The males are smaller than, and have similar coloration to, the females, but have forewings that have a concave margin, and less obvious darker markings, except for the forewing dark spot. The males have feathery antennae, and the females have thread-like antennae. The females have a much fatter abdomen. The wingspan of the males is about 5 cms. The wingspan of the females is about 7 cms.

The species is found over much of Australia, including:

  • New South Wales,
  • Victoria,
  • South Australia,
  • Western Australia, and
  • Northern Territory.


    Further reading :

    Ian F.B. Common,
    Moths of Australia,
    Melbourne University Press, 1990, pl. 27.14, p. 390.

    Peter Marriott,
    Moths of Victoria - Part 1,
    Silk Moths and Allies - BOMBYCOIDEA
    ,
    Entomological Society of Victoria, 2008, pp. 10-11.

    A. Jefferis Turner,
    Revision of Australian Lepidoptera. Lasiocampidae.,
    Proceedings of the Linnean Society of New South Wales,
    Volume 49 (1924), p. 420-421, No. 38.


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    (updated 22 March 2009)