Pseudanapaea denotata (Walker, 1865)
(previously known as Anapaea denotata)
LIMACODIDAE,   ZYGAENOIDEA
 
Don Herbison-Evans
(donherbisonevans@outlook.com)
and
Stella Crossley


male
(Photo: courtesy Graeme Cocks, Townsville, Queensland)

The adult moths of this species are pale brown, with plain hindwings, and with two groups of pale-edged darker brown spots forming a vague line across the middle of each forewing.


female
(Photo: courtesy Graeme Cocks, Townsville, Queensland)

The patterns on the wings of the male and female moths are similar. The wingspan is about 3 cms.


(Specimen: courtesy of the Macleay Museum, University of Sydney)

The species occurs in

  • Papua,

    and has been reported widely in Australia, including

  • Western Australia,
  • Northern Territory,
  • Queensland,
  • New South Wales,
  • Victoria,
  • South Australia, and

    but it is thought that Pseudanapaea specimens found in eastern Australia south of the Queensland border listed as Pseudanapaea denotata may be misidentifications of Pseudanapaea transvestita, and the specimens from Western Australia are possible misidentifications of Pseudanapaea dentifascia, but it is also possible that all these names have been mis-applied to other so-far unnamed species in the genus Pseudanapaea.


    underside
    (Photo: copyright of Brett and Marie Smith, at Ellura Sanctuary, South Australia)


    Further reading :

    Buck Richardson,
    Tropical Queensland Wildlife from Dusk to Dawn Science and Art,
    LeapFrogOz, Kuranda, 2015, p. 106.

    Francis Walker,
    Catalogue of Lepidoptera Heterocera,
    List of the Specimens of Lepidopterous Insects in the Collection of the British Museum,
    Part 32, Supplement 2 (1865), p. 474.

    Paul Zborowski and Ted Edwards,
    A Guide to Australian Moths, CSIRO Publishing, 2007, p. 113.


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    (updated 1 November 2010, 19 February 2018)