Eloasa infrequens (Scott, 1864)
(previously known as Apoda infrequens)
LIMACODIDAE ,   ZYGAENOIDEA
 
Don Herbison-Evans
(donherbisonevans@outlook.com)
and
Stella Crossley

Eloasa infrequens
drawing by Harriet and Helena Scott, listed as Apoda infrequens
,
Australian Lepidoptera, Volume 1 (1864), Plate 6,
image courtesy of Biodiversity Heritage Library, digitized by Australian Museum.

This Caterpillar is green and dome shaped, with a number of faint pale lines running from head to tail. It has been found feeding on:

  • Flintwood ( Scolopia braunii, SALICACEAE ),
  • Dwarf Plum Pine ( Podocarpus spinulosus, PODOCARPACEAE ), and
  • Red Olive Plum ( Elaeodendron australe, CELASTRACEAE ).

    Eloasa infrequens
    drawing by Harriet and Helena Scott, listed as Apoda infrequens
    ,
    Australian Lepidoptera, Volume 1 (1864), Plate 6,
    image courtesy of Biodiversity Heritage Library, digitized by Australian Museum.

    It grows to a length of about 3 cms.

    The female moths are brown with a diagonal line across each forewing. The female moths have a wingspan of about 4 cms.

    Eloasa infrequens
    female, drawing by Harriet and Helena Scott, listed as Apoda infrequens
    ,
    Australian Lepidoptera, Volume 1 (1864), Plate 6,,
    image courtesy of Biodiversity Heritage Library, digitized by Australian Museum.

    The male adult moth is brown, with white patches on each forewing. The male moths have a wingspan of about 3 cms.

    Eloasa infrequens
    male, drawing by Harriet and Helena Scott, listed as Apoda infrequens
    ,
    Australian Lepidoptera, Volume 1 (1864), Plate 6,
    image courtesy of Biodiversity Heritage Library, digitized by Australian Museum.

    The species is found in

  • Queensland, and
  • New South Wales.


    Further reading :

    Harriet, Helena, and Alexander W. Scott,
    Australian Lepidoptera and their Transformations,
    Volume 1 (1864), p. 20, and also Plate 6.


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    (written 19 June 2014)