Pseudanapaea transvestita Hering, 1931
Orange Cup Moth
(one synonym : Anapaea trigona Turner, 1942)
LIMACODIDAE,   ZYGAENOIDEA
 
Don Herbison-Evans
(donherbisonevans@outlook.com)
and
Stella Crossley

Pseudanapaea transvestita
(Photo: courtesy of Wendy Moore, near Coburg, Victoria)

This caterpillar is fat in the middle and pointed at both ends. It is green with a pale yellow stripe along the dorsal ridge. Actually the point at the head end is a just a shield that it pulls down over its grey head when it feels threatened.

Pseudanapaea transvestita
(Photo: courtesy of Wendy Moore, near Coburg, Victoria)

The caterpillar feeds on the foliage of

  • Gum Trees ( Eucalyptus species, MYRTACEAE ).

    Pseudanapaea transvestita
    Photo: courtesy of Buck Richardson, from
    Tropical Queensland Wildlife from Dusk to Dawn Science and Art

    The adult moth has freckly brown forewings, each with three orange and two white spots near the middle. The hindwings and abdomen are brown, and the thorax is off-white and hairy. The wingspan is about 3 cms.

    Pseudanapaea transvestita
    (Photo: courtesy of Jeff Keyes, Sportsman Creek Wildlife Refuge, New South Wales)

    The species occurs over much of Australia, including

  • Northern Territory,
  • Queensland,
  • New South Wales,
  • Victoria,
  • South Australia, and
  • Western Australia.

    Pseudanapaea transvestita
    underside
    (Photo: courtesy of Graeme Cocks, Townsville, Queensland)


    Further reading :

    Erich Martin Hering,
    Bombyces and Sphinges of the Indo-Australian Region: Limacodidae (Cochliopodidae),
    in Seitz, A. (ed):
    The Macrolepidoptera of the World,
    Stuttgart : Alfred Kernen Verlag, Part 10 (1931), pp. 667728, Plates 8590.

    Buck Richardson,
    Tropical Queensland Wildlife from Dusk to Dawn Science and Art,
    LeapFrogOz, Kuranda, 2015, p. 106.


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    (updated 23 December 2012, 12 April 2014)