Famegana alsulus (Herrich-Schaffer, 1869)
Black Spotted Grass Blue
(previously known as Zizeeria alsulus)
POLYOMMATINI ,   POLYOMMATINAE ,   LYCAENIDAE ,   PAPILIONOIDEA
  
Don Herbison-Evans
(donherbisonevans@outlook.com)
and
Stella Crossley

Famegana alsulus
(Photo: courtesy of Martin Purvis)

This Caterpillar is green with a purple dorsal line bordered by wiggly yellow and purple lines. The last segment has a pair of white eversible tentacles. The Caterpillar feeds on the buds and flowers of various FABACEAE, such as ;

  • Furry Pidgeonpea ( Cajanus pubescens ),
  • Acute Pidgeonpea ( Cajanus acutifolius ), and
  • Forest Indigo ( Indigofera pratensis ).

    The Caterpillar is usually attended by small black ants.

    The pupa is mottled brown, held by anal hooks and girdle to a leaf or flower.

    Famegana alsulus
    male and female upper surfaces
    (Photo: courtesy of Yusuke Takanami & Yasuo Seki)

    The adult is dark grey fading to mauve at the bases, on the upper surfaces of the wings.

    Famegana alsulus
    male and female undersides
    (Photo: courtesy of Yusuke Takanami & Yasuo Seki)

    The under-surfaces of the wings are creamy fawn, with a black spot on the tornus of each hind wing. The wingspan is about 2 cms.

    The species occurs across Asia and the south Pacific, including

  • Hong Kong,
  • Laos,
  • Philippines,
  • Thailand,

    and of course also in Australia, in

  • the north of Western Australia,
  • Northern Territory,
  • Queensland,
  • New South Wales, and
  • South Australia.


    Further reading :

    Michael F. Braby,
    Butterflies of Australia, CSIRO Publishing, Melbourne 2000, vol. 2, pp. 839-840.

    Gottlieb August Wilhelm Herrich-Schäffer,
    Neue Schmetterlinge aus dem "Museum Godeffroy" in Hamburg,
    Stettin Entomologische Zeitung,
    Volume 30 , Parts 1-3 (1869), p. 75, No. 36.


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    (update 13 May 2008, 3 November 2013)