Danis danis (Cramer, [1775])
Large Green-banded Blue
(one synonym : Thysonotis reverdini Fruhstorfer, 1915)
POLYOMMATINI ,   POLYOMMATINAE ,   LYCAENIDAE ,   PAPILIONOIDEA
  
Don Herbison-Evans
(donherbisonevans@outlook.com)
and
Stella Crossley

Danis danis
(Photo: courtesy of Buck Richardson, Kuranda, Queensland)

This Caterpillar is knobbly and orange with black spots along the sides. It has been found feeding on :

  • Red Ash ( Alphitonia excelsa, SAPINDACEAE ),
  • Shell Vine ( Connarus conchocarpus, OXALIDACEAE ),
  • Water Vine ( Rourea brachyandra, OXALIDACEAE ), and
  • Derris ( Derris species, FABACEAE ).

    When not feeding, the Caterpillar usually rests on the underside of a leaf.

    The pupa is cream with black spots, and has a length of about 1.5 cms. It is formed in the debris at the base of its foodplant.

    Danis danis
    Male
    (Specimen: courtesy of the Macleay Museum, University of Sydney)

    The male and female adults are different. On top, the males are blue with a large white patch on each wing, and a black margin to each wing. The females are black with large white patches on each wing, and a metallic blue suffusion at the base of each wing.

    Danis danis
    Female
    (Specimen: courtesy of the Macleay Museum, University of Sydney)

    Underneath, the sexes are similar. They are white with broad black margins. The wings have a metallic green arc in the black marginal band. The hindwings have a series of black spots in this green arc. The butterflies have a wing span of about 3 cms.

    Danis danis
    Female underside
    (Specimen: courtesy of the Macleay Museum, University of Sydney)

    The eggs are white, round, flattened, and spiny. They are laid singly on low level foodplant shoots.

    The species occurs as various subspecies across the south-west Pacific including

  • Indonesia,

    and in Australia it occurs as two subspecies :

  • syrius Miskin, 1890, in Queensland on Cape York, and
  • serapis Miskin, 1891, in Queensland south of Cairns, and northern New South Wales.


    Further reading :

    Michael F. Braby,
    Butterflies of Australia, CSIRO Publishing, Melbourne 2000, vol. 2, pp. 792-793.

    Pieter Cramer,
    Uitlandsche kapellen voorkomende in de drie waereld-deelen,
    Amsterdam Baalde, vol. 1 (1775), p. 111, figs. E, F, and also Plate 70, figs. E, F..


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    (updated 8 October 2012, 2 November 2013)