Smyriodes aspera Walker, 1865
Varied Geometrid
(formerly known as Cymatophora aspera)
NACOPHORINI ,   ENNOMINAE ,   GEOMETRIDAE ,   GEOMETROIDEA
 
Don Herbison-Evans
(donherbisonevans@outlook.com)
and
Stella Crossley


(Photo: courtesy of Steve Williams, Moths of Victoria: Part 5)

The Caterpillars of this species have short sparse stiff hairs, and are brown some dark spots on each segment and with a dark line along the back. The head has four dark marks. The caterpillars are thought to feed on the foliage of

  • Gum Trees ( Eucalyptus species, MYRTACEAE )

    The early instars feed only on the surface tissue of young leaves.

    Th caterpillars pupate in a flimsy cocoon in the soil or debris.


    female
    (Photo: courtesy of Marilyn Hewish, Moths of Victoria: Part 5)

    The adult moths have pale brown or grey forewings, each with pattern including a set of three dark lines vaguely in the shape of a trident. The areas between the lines vary from grey to rusty brown. The hindwings are paler than the forewings and have very vague patterns. The moths have a wingspan of about 3 cms. In its natural posture, the moth is inclined to keep its forewings covering its hindwings.


    (Photo: courtesy of Marilyn Hewish, Moths of Victoria: Part 5)

    The species occurs in Australia in

  • Victoria,
  • South Australia, and
  • Western Australia.

    This species is currently named with an inappropriate genus, and is unplaced until a more suitable genus is described.


    Further reading :

    Marilyn Hewish,
    Moths of Victoria: Part 5 - Satin Moths and Allies - GEOMETROIDEA (A),
    Entomological Society of Victoria, 2014, pp. 16-17.

    Francis Walker,
    Catalogue of Lepidoptera Heterocera,
    List of the Specimens of Lepidopterous Insects in the Collection of the British Museum,
    Part 32, Supplement 2 (1865), pp. 601-602.


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    (written 15 January 2016)