Chlenias banksiaria (Le Guillou, 1841)
(one synonym is : Cleophana australasiae Wallengren, 1860)
NACOPHORINI ,   ENNOMINAE ,   GEOMETRIDAE ,   GEOMETROIDEA
 
Don Herbison-Evans
(donherbisonevans@outlook.com)
and
Dave Britton & Stella Crossley

Chlenias banksiaria
(Photo: copyright Cathy Young)

This Caterpillar is black with a thin pale mid-dorsal line, a broad white line along each side, and with a conspicuous red dot above its only pair of ventral prolegs. Its true legs are also red. Its head capsule is cream with black or brown markings.

Chlenias banksiaria
(Photo: copyright Dave Britton)

This species has been recorded as feeding on many species of unrelated plants, and has also adapted to feeding on the introduced

  • Monterey Pine ( Pinus radiata, PINACEAE ).

    Chlenias banksiaria
    (Photo: courtesy of Donald Hobern, Aranda, Australian Capital Territory)

    The adult moths are grey with variable darker radial lines and other markings on the forewings.

    Chlenias banksiaria
    female
    (Photo: copyright Dave Britton)

    The species occurs in:

  • New South Wales,
  • Australian Capital Territory,
  • Victoria,
  • Tasmania, and
  • South Australia.

    Chlenias banksiaria
    male
    (Photo: copyright Dave Britton)

    This name is probably being applied to a composite group of several distinct species. Further work is needed to identify and separate them.

    Chlenias banksiaria
    underside
    (Photo: courtesy of Donald Hobern, Aranda, Australian Capital Territory)


    Further reading :

    Marilyn Hewish,
    Moths of Victoria: Part 5 - Satin Moths and Allies - GEOMETROIDEA (A),
    Entomological Society of Victoria, 2014, pp. 22-23.

    Elie Jean Francois Le Guillou,
    Description de huit espèces de Lépidoptères découvertes pendant le voyage de la Zélee,
    Revue Zoologique par la Societe Cuvierienne,
    Paris, 1841, p. 257, No. 6.

    Catherine J. Young,
    Characterisation of the Australian Nacophorini and a Phylogeny for the Geometridae from Molecular and Morphological Data,
    Ph.D. thesis, University of Tasmania, 2003.


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    (updated 25 October 2010, 17 May 2017)