Amphiclasta lygaea Turner, 1906
Ragged Geometrid
NACOPHORINI ,   ENNOMINAE ,   GEOMETRIDAE ,   GEOMETROIDEA
 
Don Herbison-Evans
(donherbisonevans@outlook.com)
and
Stella Crossley

Amphiclasta lygaea
(Photo: courtesy of Steve Williams, Moths of Victoria: Part 5)

These Caterpillars initially are smooth and dark brown, with a knob on the tail. Later instars became either green or reddish-brown. They walk by looping, as they are missing three pairs of prolegs.

Amphiclasta lygaea
green form
(Photo: courtesy of Steve Williams, Moths of Victoria: Part 5)

The caterpillars in captivity preferred to eat the foliage of

  • Red Box ( Eucalyptus polyanthemos, MYRTACEAE ).

    Amphiclasta lygaea
    brown form of caterpillar
    forming its cocoon
       
    Amphiclasta lygaea
    naked pupa extracted
    from inside a cocoon
        Photos: courtesy of
    Steve Williams,
    Moths of Victoria: Part 5

    The caterpillars pupated in a loose cocoon in the ground debris.

    Amphiclasta lygaea
    male
    (Photos: courtesy of Marilyn Hewish, Moths of Victoria: Part 5)

    The adult moths have dark brown forewings, with unevenly scalloped margins. The hindwings are pale brown darkening toward the tornus, each hindwing with a short white-edged dark line by the tornus. The first abdominal segment is black. The wingspan is about 4.5 cms.

    Amphiclasta lygaea
    (Photo: courtesy of Donald Hobern, Aranda, Australian Capital Territory)

    In its natural posture, the moth often holds the tip of the abdomen curled upward.

    Amphiclasta lygaea
    common posture
    (Photo: courtesy of Donald Hobern, Aranda, Australian Capital Territory)

    The eggs are minutely pitted and ovoid, and are laid in loose clusters. Initially the eggs are pale green but as hatching approaches, they become red, then dark purplish-brown.

    Amphiclasta lygaea
    eggs, magnified
    (Photo: courtesy of Steve Williams, Moths of Victoria: Part 5)

    The species has been found in:

  • Australian Capital Territory, and
  • Victoria,
  • South Australia, and
  • Western Australia.


    Further reading:

    Marilyn Hewish,
    Moths of Victoria: Part 5,
    Satin Moths and Allies - GEOMETROIDEA (A)
    ,
    Entomological Society of Victoria, 2014, pp. 6-7, 24-25.

    A. Jefferis Turner,
    New Australian Lepidoptera, with synonymic and other notes,
    Transactions of the Royal Society of South Australia,
    Volume 30 (1906), p. 132.


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    (updated 29 April 2010, 6 June 2014, 19 December 2015)