Amelora sparsularia (Guenée, 1857)
(one synonym : Panagra oxytona Turner, 1926)
NACOPHORINI ,   ENNOMINAE ,   GEOMETRIDAE ,   GEOMETROIDEA
 
Don Herbison-Evans
(donherbisonevans@outlook.com)
and
Cathy Young & Stella Crossley


(Photo: copyright Cathy Young)

These Caterpillars are brown with a pale band along each side and a dark mark on the back of each abdominal segment. The body has short sparse black hairs. The head has black speckles. The caterpillars feed on a wide variety of low-growing dicotyledonous herbs.


(Photo: copyright Cathy Young)

The adult moths are buff coloured with a pattern of brown spots and speckles, including a larger elliptical outline near the center of each forewing. The wingspan is about 4 cms.


male, drawing by Achille Guenée, listed as Panagra sparsularia
,
Uranides et Phalénites, in Boisduval & Guenée:
Histoire naturelle des insectes; spécies général des lépidoptères,
Volume 9, Part 10 (1858), Plate 12, fig. 4,
image courtesy of Biodiversity Heritage Library, digitized by Smithsonian Libraries.

The eggs are laid unattached, and are barrel-shaped with microscopic ridges. Their diameter is about 0.7 mm. Initially they are white, later developing red spots, then turning grey as hatching approaches.


eggs, magnified
(Photo: copyright Cathy Young)

The species has usually been found at high altitude (above 1000 metres) in

  • New South Wales,
  • Victoria,
  • Tasmania, and
  • South Australia.


    Further reading :

    Achille Guenée,
    Uranides et Phalénites,
    in Boisduval & Guenée:
    Histoire naturelle des insectes; spécies général des lépidoptères,
    Volume 9, Part 10 (1858), p. 131, No. 1132, and also Plate 12, fig. 4.

    Peter B. McQuillan,
    The Tasmanian Geometrid Moths Associated with the Genus Amelora auctorum (Lepidoptera : Geometridae : Ennomina),
    Invertebrate Taxonomy,
    Volume 10, Issue 3, 1996, pp. 433-506.

    Cathy Young,
    Characterisation of the Australian Nacophorini and a Phylogeny for the Geometridae from Molecular and Morphological Data,
    Ph.D. thesis, University of Tasmania, 2003.


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    (updated 24 July 2013)