Manoba brunellus (Hampson, 1893)
synonyms :
(Nola achromia Hampson, 1909)
(Celamoides corticella van Eecke, 1926)
(Meganola pseudohypena Inoue et al., 1982)
NOLINAE,   NOLIDAE,   NOCTUOIDEA
 
Don Herbison-Evans
(donherbisonevans@outlook.com)
and
Stella Crossley

Manoba brunellus
(Photo: courtesy of CSIRO/BIO Photography Group, Centre for Biodiversity Genomics, University of Guelph, listed as Nola achromia)

The Caterpillar of this species has been found feeding on the fruits of

  • Melastoma ( Melastoma species, ( MELASTOMATACEAE ).

    The caterpillar does not stack head capsules when moulting, unlike other species in NOLINAE).

    Manoba brunellus
    drawing: George Francis Hampson, listed as Rhynchopalpus brunellus
    ,
    The Macrolepidoptera Heterocera of Ceylon,
    Illustrations of Typical Specimens of Lepidoptera Heterocera in the Collection of the British Museum,
    Part 9 (1893), Plate CLVIII, fig. 31,
    image courtesy of Biodiversity Heritage Library, digitized by Gerstein Library, University of Toronto.

    The adult moth has fawn forewings. each crossed by two vague curved dark speckled lines, with more dark speckles around the margin. The hindwings are pale fawn, fading to white at the bases. The moth has a wingspan of about 2 cms.

    The species has been found across south-east Asia, including

  • Borneo,
  • India,
  • Japan,
  • Sri Lanka,
  • Sumatra,

    and also in Australia in:

  • Queensland,

    and has been introduced in

  • Hawaii,


    Further reading :

    George Francis Hampson,
    The Macrolepidoptera Heterocera of Ceylon,
    Illustrations of typical specimens of Lepidoptera Heterocera in the collection of the British Museum,
    Part 9 (1893), p. 89, and also Plate 158, fig 31.

    George F. Hampson,
    Descriptions of new genera and species of Syntomidae, Arctiadae, Agaristidae and Noctuidae,
    Annals and Magazine of Natural History,
    Series 8, Volume 4 (1909), p. 352, No. 75b.


    previous
    back
    caterpillar
    Australian
    Australian Butterflies
    butterflies
    Australian
    home
    Lepidoptera
    Australian
    Australian Moths
    moths
    next
    next
    caterpillar

    (written 10 June 2019)