Aquita tactalis (Walker, 1863)
Tactile Tuft-moth
(erroneously : Zia tactilis)
NOLINAE,   NOLIDAE,   NOCTUOIDEA
 
Don Herbison-Evans
(donherbisonevans@outlook.com)
and
Stella Crossley and
Brett and Marie Smith

Aquita tactalis
(Photo: courtesy of Nadine Brown, Gawler Ranges, South Australia)

These Caterpillars are hairy and grey, with a fine pattern of white lines, a broad off-white line along the back, and four off-white or dark grey verrucae on each segment sprouting white and black hairs, and an orange knob on the back of the two penultimate abdominal segments. The caterpillars feed on various species of MYRTACEAE, for example :

  • Teatree ( Leptospermum species), and
  • Slender Honey Myrtle ( Melaleuca gibbosa ).

    Aquita tactalis
    cocoons on a twig
    (Photo: courtesy of Nadine Brown, Gawler Ranges, South Australia)

    The caterpillars pupate in dense cocoons on a twig of the foodplant.

    Aquita tactalis
    (Photo: courtesy of Nadine Brown, Gawler Ranges, South Australia)

    The adult moth has fawn and brown forewings with an indistinct pattern, including two triangular white streaks, a white area by the wingtips, and a comples dark knot near the middle It has several areas of raised scales on the forewings. The hindwings are pale brown darkening tward the margins. The moth has a wingspan of about 3 cms.

    It is found over most of the southern half of Australia, including

  • New South Waes,
  • Victoria,
  • South Australia, and
  • Western Australia.

    Aquita tactalis
    (Specimen: courtesy of Macleay Museum, University of Sydney)


    Further reading :

    Ian F.B. Common,
    Moths of Australia, Melbourne University Press, 1990, fig. 47.17, p. 456.

    Peter Marriott,
    Moths of Victoria - Part 2,
    Tiger Moths and Allies - NOCTUOIDEA (A)
    ,
    Entomological Society of Victoria, 2009, pp. 32-33.

    Francis Walker,
    Crambites & Tortricites,
    List of the Specimens of Lepidopterous Insects in the Collection of the British Museum,
    Part 27 (1863), p. 110, No. 1.


    previous
    back
    caterpillar
    Australian
    Australian Butterflies
    butterflies
    Australian
    home
    caterpillars
    Australian
    Australian Moths
    moths
    next
    next
    caterpillar

    (updated 1 March 2011, 31 March 2018)