Epicoma barnardi (T.P. Lucas, 1890)
(previously known as Teara barnardi)
THAUMETOPOEINAE,   NOTODONTIDAE,   NOCTUOIDEA
 
Don Herbison-Evans
(donherbisonevans@yahoo.com)
and
Stella Crossley

Epicoma barnardi
(Photo: courtesy of Geoff Byrne, Broome, Western Australia)

This Caterpillar is grey with grey hairs, black tufts on the back of each segment, and has some long white hairs projecting from the thorax. The caterpillar has been found feeding on

  • Phylodinous Wattles (Acacia species, MIMOSACEAE).

    Epicoma barnardi
    cocoon
    (Photo: courtesy of Geoff Byrne, Broome, Western Australia)

    The caterpillar pupated in pale brown oval cocoon.

    Epicoma barnardi
    female
    (Photo: courtesy of David Rentz, Kuranda, Queensland)

    The wings of the adult female moths of this species are dark grey, each with a submarginal arc of pale spots. The forewings also have a pale brown area and pale speckles at at the bases.

    Epicoma barnardi
    (Photo: courtesy of Geoff Byrne, Broome, Western Australia)

    The thorax is covered in long brown or black scales, which are lost easily to reveal a bald brown patch. The abdomen is black, tipped with a bunch of golden hairs.

    Epicoma barnardi
    (Photo: courtesy of Australian Museum)

    The males are similar to the females except for the forewings, which are white each with a curvy dark submarginal line. Both sexes have a wingspan of about 4 cms.

    The species has been found in

  • Western Australia,
  • Northern Territory, and
  • Queensland.


    Further reading :

    Thomas P. Lucas,
    On Queensland and other Australian Macro-Lepidoptera, with localities, and descriptions of new species,
    Proceedings of the Linnean Society of New South Wales,
    Series 2, Volume 4, Part 4 (1890), pp. 1088-1089.

    Buck Richardson,
    Tropical Queensland Wildlife from Dusk to Dawn Science and Art,
    LeapFrogOz, Kuranda, 2015, pp. 177-178.


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    (written 11 January 2012, updated 7 April 2019, 6 February 2021)