Pheraspis mesotypa Turner, 1903
NOTODONTINAE,   NOTODONTIDAE,   NOCTUOIDEA
 
Don Herbison-Evans
(donherbisonevans@yahoo.com)
and
Stella Crossley

Pheraspis mesotypa
early instar
(Photo: courtesy of Dick Whitford, Mt. Molloy, Queensland)

These Caterpillars are basically green with pale stripes. Early instars have red shading on the back and red patches on the sides. The early instars have two short red horns behind the head, and a stumpy red spike on the tail. The spiracles are black with red shading around each one. The head has a pair of black bars.

Pheraspis mesotypa
early instar, close-up of head
(Photo: courtesy of Dick Whitford, Mt. Molloy, Queensland)

Later instars develop reddish, white, and yellow stripes, and lose the horns behind the head and the tail stump. The caterpillars feed on

  • Wattles (Acacia species, MIMOSACEAE)

    Pheraspis mesotypa

    Pheraspis mesotypa
    later instar
    (Photos: courtesy of Dick Whitford, Mt. Molloy, Queensland)

    The head becomes green with a pair of dark marks by the jaws.

    Pheraspis mesotypa
    later instar, close-up of head
    (Photo: courtesy of Dick Whitford, Mt. Molloy, Queensland)

    The caterpillars grow to a length of about 4.5 cms.

    Pheraspis mesotypa
    pupa
    (Photo: courtesy of Dick Whitford, Mt. Molloy, Queensland)

    The pupa is brown, with a length of about 2.2 cms.

    Pheraspis mesotypa
    Photo: courtesy of Buck Richardson, from
    Tropical Queensland Wildlife from Dusk to Dawn Science and Art

    The adult moths of this species has forewings which are grey with varied dark markings and lines.

    Pheraspis mesotypa
    (Photo: courtesy of Dick Whitford, Mt. Molloy, Queensland)

    The hindwings are orange at the hind margin fading to grey at the margin. The wingspan is about 5 cms.

    Pheraspis mesotypa
    (Photo: courtesy of Graeme Cocks, Townsville, Queensland)

    The species has been found in

  • Western Australia, and
  • Queensland.

    Pheraspis mesotypa
    underside
    (Photo: courtesy of Graeme Cocks, Townsville, Queensland)


    Further reading :

    Buck Richardson,
    Tropical Queensland Wildlife from Dusk to Dawn Science and Art,
    LeapFrogOz, Kuranda, 2015, p. 176.

    A. Jefferis Turner,
    Revision of Australian Lepidoptera,
    Proceedings of the Linnean Society of New South Wales,
    Volume 28 (1903), pp. 62-63, No. 17.


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    (updated 12 November 2012, 31 March 2021)