Argynnina cyrila Waterhouse & Lyell, 1914
Cyril's Brown
(previously known as Xenica cyrila)
SATYRINAE ,   NYMPHALIDAE ,   PAPILIONOIDEA
 
Don Herbison-Evans
(donherbisonevans@outlook.com)
and
Stella Crossley

These Caterpillars are green with white stripes, sparse prominent hairs, and a black head. Later instars may become brown, and develop a diamond shaped pattern along the back. The caterpillars have a pair of horns on the head and tail.

Argynnina cyrila
(Photo: courtesy of R.P. Field, Museum Victoria)

The caterpillars feed on :

  • various species of Grass ( POACEAE ).

    The caterpillars grow to a length of about 2.5 cms.

    The pupa is black with length of about 1 cm. It is suspended from a cremaster from the foodplant.

    Argynnina cyrila
    (Photo: courtesy of Laura Levens, Upper Beaconsfield, Victoria)

    The upper surfaces of the wings of the adult butterflies are brown with yellow patches. The upper sides of the hind wings have one eyespot each, and the forewings each have a row or three white spots.

    Argynnina cyrila
    (Specimen: courtesy of the Macleay Museum, University of Sydney)

    Underneath, the forewings are fawn with black and off-white patches, and a row of three white spots. The underside of each hindwing is fawn with dull orange patches, and a dull eyespot. The butterflies have a wing span of about 4 cms. They are commonly encountered in lush gullies, where the males activly fly around defending territories and visiting local flowers. The females are more secretive.

    Argynnina cyrila
    underside
    (Specimen: courtesy of the Macleay Museum, University of Sydney)

    The male adults of this species seem to have a predilection for congregating at hill tops.

    Argynnina cyrila
    (Photo: courtesy of Laura Levens, Upper Beaconsfield, Victoria)

    The eggs are bright green and spherical. They are laid singly on a foodplant.

    Argynnina cyrila
    (Photo: courtesy of Laura Levens, Upper Beaconsfield, Victoria)

    The species is found in

  • southern Queensland,
  • New South Wales,
  • Victoria, and
  • South Australia.


    Further reading :

    Michael F. Braby,
    Butterflies of Australia, CSIRO Publishing, Melbourne 2000, vol. 2, pp. 489-490.


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    (updated 17 October 2011, 20 September 2013)