Geitoneura minyas (Waterhouse & Lyell, 1914)
Western Xenica
(previously known as Xenica minyas)
SATYRINAE ,   NYMPHALIDAE ,   PAPILIONOIDEA
 
Don Herbison-Evans
(donherbisonevans@outlook.com)
and
Stella Crossley


male
(Photo: courtesy of Ken Harris, Western Australia)

The Caterpillar of this species is green with a rounded head. It feeds on various grasses ( POACEAE ), including the introduced:

  • Veldt Grass ( Ehrharta species),


    female, drawing by Waterhouse and Lyell, listed as Xenica minyas,
    The Butterflies of Australia, Angus & Robertson, 1914, Sydney, fig. 820,
    image courtesy of Biodiversity Heritage Library, digitized by Museum Victoria.

    The adults of this species are orange with brown veins and markings. They have an eyespot on each forewing, and a vestigial eyespot on each hindwing. Their wingspan is about 3.5 cms. They look like to a pale form of Geitoneura klugii.


    male wing undersides, drawing by Waterhouse and Lyell, listed as Xenica minyas,
    The Butterflies of Australia, Angus & Robertson, 1914, Sydney, fig. 819,
    image courtesy of Biodiversity Heritage Library, digitized by Museum Victoria.

    The species has been found in

  • Queensland,
  • Victoria, and
  • Western Australia.


    female wing undersides, drawing by Waterhouse & Lyell, listed as Xenica minyas,
    The Butterflies of Australia, Angus & Robertson, 1914, Sydney, fig. 820,
    image courtesy of Biodiversity Heritage Library, digitized by Museum Victoria.

    It has been suggested that it is present as two subspecies :

  • minyas, and
  • mjobergi (Aurivillius, 1920).


    Further reading :

    Michael F. Braby,
    Butterflies of Australia,
    CSIRO Publishing, Melbourne 2000, vol. 2, pp. 506-507.

    Gustavus Athol Waterhouse & George Lyell,
    The Butterflies of Australia,
    Angus & Robertson, 1914, Sydney, p. 45, No. 47, and also Plate 40, figs. 819, 820.


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    (updated 20 March 2004, 6 December 2013, 16 March 2015, 12 March 2016)