Philobota hydara Meyrick, 1884
(one synonym is Atribasta fulvifusa Turner, 1916)
PHILOBOTA GROUP
OECOPHORINAE,   OECOPHORIDAE,   GELECHIOIDEA
 
Don Herbison-Evans,
(donherbisonevans@outlook.com)
and
Stella Crossley

Philobota hydara
(Photo: courtesy of CSIRO/BIO Photography Group, Centre for Biodiversity Genomics, University of Guelph)

The adult moth of this species has off-white forewings, each with a pattern of scattered brown markings. The hindwings are pale brown, darkening along the costas. The wingspan is about 2.5 cms.

The species has been found in

  • Queensland, and
  • New South Wales.

    The name Philobota hydara Group is applied to a set of related species in the genus Philobota which includes

  • Philobota chionoptera,
  • Philobota dedecorata,
  • Philobota deltoloma,
  • Philobota diaereta,
  • Philobota eremosema,
  • Philobota fumifera,
  • Philobota hiracistis,
  • Philobota humerella,
  • Philobota hydara,
  • Philobota hypocausta,
  • Philobota hypopolia,
  • Philobota ischnodes,
  • Philobota leptochorda,
  • Philobota petrinodes,
  • Philobota physaula,
  • Philobota pilidiota,
  • Philobota pilipes,
  • Philobota protecta,
  • Philobota psammochroa,
  • Philobota scitula,
  • Philobota sordidella, and
  • Philobota stictoloma.


    Further Reading:

    Ian F.B. Common,
    Oecophorine Genera of Australia II: The Chezala, Philobota and Eulechria groups (Lepidoptera: Oecophoridae),
    Monographs on Australian Lepidoptera Volume 5,
    CSIRO Publishing, 1997, pp. 266, 269-270, 272, 280.

    Edward Meyrick,
    Descriptions of Australian Micro-lepidoptera. X,
    Proceedings of the Linnean Society of New South Wales,
    Series 1, Volume 8, Number 4 (1884), pp. 473, 494-495 No. 211.

    A. Jefferis Turner,
    Studies in Australian Microlepidoptera,
    Proceedings of the Linnean Society of New South Wales,
    Volume 41 (1916), p. 348.


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    (written 29 November 2018)