Eurema laeta (Boisduval, 1836)
Spotless Grass Yellow, Line Grass Yellow
(previously known as Terias laeta)
COLIADINAE,   PIERIDAE,   PAPILIONOIDEA
 
Don Herbison-Evans
(donherbisonevans@outlook.com)
and
Stella Crossley

The Caterpillar of this species is green with a darker green line along the back, and yellow lines along each side. When resting, it lies along the midrib of a leaflet. It feeds on various plants in CAESALPINIACEAE including

  • Fish-bone Cassia ( Chamaecrista mimosoides ), and
  • Mogdad Coffee ( Senna occidentalis ).

    The Caterpillar grows to a length of about 3 cms. The pupa is green and attached to a twig of the foodplant with a cremaster and girdle.

    Eurema laeta
    (Specimen: courtesy of the The Australian Museum)

    The upper surfaces of the wings of the adult butterflies are yellow with black edges. The undersides are pale orange with brown markings, and with a large yellow oval under each forewing. The butterfly has a wingspan of about 3 cms.

    Eurema laeta
    underside, dry season form
    (Specimen: courtesy of the The Australian Museum)

    The species occurs as various subspecies across Asia, including

  • Hong Kong,
  • India,
  • Japan,
  • Korea,
  • Sri Lanka,

    and in the tropical north of Australia in

  • Northern Territory, and
  • Queensland,
    as two different forms:
  • sana (Butler, 1877) the wet season form (yellow underneath), and
  • lineata (Miskin, 1889) the dry season form (brown underneath).


    Further reading :

    Jean-Baptiste Alphonse Dechauffour de Boisduval,
    Species Général des Lépidoptéres,
    Histoire naturelle des insectes,
    Volume 1 (1836), pp. 674-675, No 56.

    Michael F. Braby,
    Butterflies of Australia, CSIRO Publishing, Melbourne 2000, vol. 1, pp. 299-301.

    Buck Richardson,
    Tropical Queensland Wildlife from Dusk to Dawn Science and Art,
    LeapFrogOz, Kuranda, 2015, p. 225.


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    (updated 9 July 2009, 29 October 2013)