Narycia guildingi (Scott, 1864)
(previously known as Conoeca guildingi)
PSYCHIDAE,   TINEOIDEA
 
Don Herbison-Evans
(donherbisonevans@outlook.com)
and
Stella Crossley


(Photo: courtesy of Steve Pearson, Airlie Beach, Queensland)

The Caterpillars of this species have been found feeding on a variety of plants including:

  • Kunzea ( Kunzea corifolia, MYRTACEAE ),
  • Woolly Teatree ( Leptospermum lanigerum, MYRTACEAE ), and
  • Common Rush ( Juncus effusus, JUNCACEAE ).


    drawing by Harriet & Helena Scott, listed as Conoeca guildingi
    ,
    Australian Lepidoptera, Volume 1 (1864), Plate 9,
    courtesy of the Australian Museum.

    The caterpillars each live in a tapering case covered in bits of chewed bark. The case grows to a length of about 3 cms.


    (Photo: courtesy of David Akers, Won Wron, Victoria)

    The male adult moth of this species is grey with dark speckles. The hindwings are grey with darker margins. The abdomen is banded yellow and black.


    female, drawing by Harriet & Helena Scott, listed as Conoeca guildingi
    ,
    Australian Lepidoptera, Volume 1 (1864), Plate 9,
    courtesy of the Australian Museum.

    The male has white forewings speckled with black, black hindwings, a pale yellow thorax, and a black hairy abdomen. The male has only 2/3 the wingspan of the female.


    male, drawing by Harriet & Helena Scott, listed as Conoeca guildingi
    ,
    Australian Lepidoptera, Volume 1 (1864), Plate 9,
    courtesy of the Australian Museum.

    The species has been found in

  • Queensland,
  • New South Wales,
  • Victoria, and
  • Tasmania.


    Further reading :

    Ian F.B. Common,
    Moths of Australia,
    Melbourne University Press, 1990, p. 179.

    Harriet, Helena, and Alexander W. Scott,
    Australian Lepidoptera and their Transformations,
    Australian Lepidoptera,
    Volume 1 (1864), p. 27, Plate 9.


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    (written 31 May 2014, updated 26 October 2017)