Conoeca guildingi Scott, 1864
(sometimes known as Narycia guildingi)
PSYCHIDAE,   TINEOIDEA
 
Don Herbison-Evans
(donherbisonevans@yahoo.com)
and
Stella Crossley

Conoeca guildingi
(Photo: courtesy of Steve Pearson, Airlie Beach, Queensland)

The Caterpillars of this species have been found feeding on a variety of plants including:

  • Kunzea ( Kunzea corifolia, MYRTACEAE ),
  • Woolly Teatree ( Leptospermum lanigerum, MYRTACEAE ), and
  • Common Rush ( Juncus effusus, JUNCACEAE ).

    Conoeca guildingi
    drawing by Harriet & Helena Scott, listed as Conoeca guildingi
    ,
    Australian Lepidoptera, Volume 1 (1864), Plate 9.

    The caterpillars each live in a tapering case covered in bits of chewed bark. The case grows to a length of about 3 cms. The caterpillars have a black head, which normally is the only part of the body that they protrude from the case.

    Conoeca guildingi
    female
    (Photo: courtesy of David Akers, Won Wron, Victoria)

    The adult moths of this species is grey with a variable pattern of dark splotches or speckles. The hindwings are grey with darker margins. The abdomen is yellow but usually covered in dark grey hair.

    Conoeca guildingi
    male
    (Photo: courtesy of Ian McMillan, Imbil, Queensland)

    The female has a wingspan of about 4.5 cms The male has a wingspan of about 3 cms.

    Conoeca guildingi
    female
    (Photo: courtesy of CSIRO/BIO Photography Group, Centre for Biodiversity Genomics, University of Guelph)

    The species has been found in

  • Queensland,
  • New South Wales,
  • Australian Capital Territory,
  • Victoria, and
  • Tasmania.

    Conoeca guildingi
    male
    (Photo: courtesy of CSIRO/BIO Photography Group, Centre for Biodiversity Genomics, University of Guelph)


    Further reading :

    Ian F.B. Common,
    Moths of Australia,
    Melbourne University Press, 1990, p. 179.

    Harriet, Helena, and Alexander W. Scott,
    Australian Lepidoptera and their Transformations,
    Australian Lepidoptera,
    Volume 1 (1864), p. 27, Plate 9.


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    (written 31 May 2014, updated 24 July 2019, 4 October 2020)