Syntherata mirata Lane, 2003
SATURNIIDAE,   BOMBYCOIDEA
 
Don Herbison-Evans
(donherbisonevans@outlook.com)
and
Stella Crossley


Photo: courtesy of David A. Lane, (Ted) E.D. Edwards, & Stefan Naumann, from
A revision of the genus Syntherata Maasen, 1873 (Lepidoptera: Saturniidae) within Australia, with the description of three new species, and descriptions of their life histories,
The European Entomologist, Volume 3, Part 1 (2010), pp. 17-21.

The young caterpillars of this species are pale green with dark markings, and are covered in stiff hairs.


Photo: courtesy of David A. Lane, (Ted) E.D. Edwards, & Stefan Naumann, from
A revision of the genus Syntherata Maasen, 1873 (Lepidoptera: Saturniidae) within Australia, with the description of three new species, and descriptions of their life histories,
The European Entomologist, Volume 3, Part 1 (2010), pp. 17-21.

The caterpillars have been found feeding on trees from EUPHORBIACEAE, including

  • Blind-your-eye Mangrove ( Excoecaria agallocha ), and
  • Guttapercha Tree ( Excoecaria parvifolia ).

    Later the caterpillars become lime-green with a yellow line along each side, and have purple tubercles each of which has a cluster of short stiff hairs.


    cocoon
    Photo: courtesy of David A. Lane, (Ted) E.D. Edwards, & Stefan Naumann, from
    A revision of the genus Syntherata Maasen, 1873 (Lepidoptera: Saturniidae) within Australia, with the description of three new species, and descriptions of their life histories,
    The European Entomologist, Volume 3, Part 1 (2010), pp. 17-21.

    The caterpillar pupates in an oval cocoon in a shaded area on the food plant or nearby vegetation, typically undr a branch or on the south side of a trunk. Metamorphosis can take up to three years depending on climate.


    Photo: courtesy of David A. Lane, (Ted) E.D. Edwards, & Stefan Naumann, from
    A revision of the genus Syntherata Maasen, 1873 (Lepidoptera: Saturniidae) within Australia, with the description of three new species, and descriptions of their life histories,
    The European Entomologist, Volume 3, Part 1 (2010), pp. 17-21.

    The adult moths are yellow with two or more zig-zag or dotted brown lines across each wing. The forewings each have a round transparent spot in the middle, and the hindwings each have a dark spot in the middle. The moths typically have a wingspan of 8 cms.

    The species occurs on

  • Queensland.


    eggs, highly magnified
    Photo: courtesy of David A. Lane, (Ted) E.D. Edwards, & Stefan Naumann, from
    A revision of the genus Syntherata Maasen, 1873 (Lepidoptera: Saturniidae) within Australia, with the description of three new species, and descriptions of their life histories,
    The European Entomologist, Volume 3, Part 1 (2010), pp. 17-21.

    The eggs are laid in short rows, and are pale green and ovate, and have a diameter of about 1.5 mm.


    Further reading:

    David Lane,
    A new species of Syntherata Maasen (Lepidoptera: Saturniidae) from northern Australia,
    Butterfly & Other Invertebrates Club Inc. Newsletter,
    Number 31 (2003), pp. 6-12.

    David A. Lane, (Ted) E.D. Edwards, & Stefan Naumann,
    A revision of the genus Syntherata Maasen, 1873 (Lepidoptera: Saturniidae) within Australia, with the description of three new species, and descriptions of their life histories,
    The European Entomologist,
    Volume 3, Part 1 (2010), pp. 17-21, figs. 18, 40-53.


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    (written 10 December 2017)