Daphnis hypothous (Cramer, 1780)
MACROGLOSSINAE ,   SPHINGIDAE ,   BOMBYCOIDEA
 
Don Herbison-Evans
(donherbisonevans@outlook.com)
and
Stella Crossley


(Photo: courtesy of Tony Pittaway & Ian Kitching, The Natural History Museum, London).

The Caterpillars of this species are green or brown, with some variable coloured lines along the body, a row of blue dashes along each side, and a white and blue eyespot each side of the meta-thorax. There is a harmless strong backward-curving spine on the last segment. The true legs are red.

The caterpillars have been found on various species in RUBIACEAE including

  • Breonia,
  • Cinchona,
  • Ixora,
  • Pavetta,
  • Uncaria,
  • Wendlandia.

    and also

  • Alstonia ( APOCYNACEAE ).


    Photo: courtesy of Buck Richardson, from
    Tropical Queensland Wildlife from Dusk to Dawn Science and Art

    The adult moths have wings that have a bold pattern of pale grey and dark green or brown, including pale spots at the base and the tip of each forewing. The hindwings have a wavy pattern of pale and dark brown. There are white bands between some of the abdominal segments.


    drawing by Pieter Cramer, listed as Sphinx hypothoŘs,

    Uitlandsche kapellen voorkomende in de drie waereld-deelen,
    Amsterdam Baalde, Volume 3 (1782), Plate CCLXXXV, fig. D,
    image courtesy of Biodiversity Heritage Library, digitized by Smithsonian Libraries.

    This species occurs as various subspecies in south-east Asia, including ;

  • China,
  • India,
  • Malaysia,

    as well as in Australia as pallescens Butler, 1875 in

  • Queensland.


    Further reading :

    Pieter Cramer,
    Description de Papillons Exotiques,
    Uitlandsche kapellen voorkomende in de drie waereld-deelen,
    Amsterdam Baalde, Vol. 3 (1779), p. 165, and also Plate 285, fig. D.

    Buck Richardson,
    Tropical Queensland Wildlife from Dusk to Dawn Science and Art,
    LeapFrogOz, Kuranda, 2015, p. 197.


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    (written 27 November 2015)