Hopliocnema lacunosa Tuttle, Moulds, and Lane, 2012
SMERINTHINAE,   SPHINGIDAE,   BOMBYCOIDEA
 
Don Herbison-Evans
(donherbisonevans@outlook.com)
and
Stella Crossley

Hopliocnema lacunosa
(Photo: courtesy of Axel Hausmann, SNSB, Zoologische Staatssammlung Muenchen)

The early instar Caterpillars of this species are green, with no tail spike. Later instars develop a blunt reddish horn on the head, and a tiny black tail spike, length about 1 mm. The caterpillars are thought to feed on various species of

  • Emu Bush, ( Eremophila species, MYOPORACEAE ).

    The caterpillars were observed to go only through four instar phases, the lowest number of any of the SPHINGIDAE species. The caterpillars grow to a length of about 4.5 cms. They burrow into the ground to pupate at a depth of about 10 cms. The pupa has a length of about 2.5 cms.

    The adult moths have grey forewings, each with two pairs of wavy dark stripes, and a small central black-edged pale spot. The hindwings are grey with a broad darkband along the hind-margin. The wingspan is about 4 cms. The adults have no haustellum, and cannot drink or feed.

    Hopliocnema lacunosa
    underside
    (Photo: courtesy of CSIRO/BIO Photography Group, Centre for Biodiversity Genomics, University of Guelph)

    The species is found in

  • Western Australia, and
  • South Australia.


    Further reading :

    Max S. Moulds, James P. Tuttle and David A. Lane.
    Hawkmoths of Australia,
    Monographs on Australian Lepidoptera Series, Volume 13 (2020),
    pp. 154-156, Plates 34, 78, 87.

    James P. Tuttle, Max S. Moulds, & David A. Lane,
    A Review of the hawk moth genus Hopliocnema Rothschild and Jordan, with the description of two new species (Lepidoptera: Sphingidae),
    The European Entomologist,
    Volume 4, Part 2 (2012), p. 71.


    previous
    back
    caterpillar
    Australian
    Australian Butterflies
    butterflies
    Australian
    home
    Lepidoptera
    Australian
    Australian Moths
    moths
    next
    next
    caterpillar

    (written 21 March 2020)