Atelocentra chloraspis Meyrick, 1884
(erroneously known as Atelocentra chlorapsis)
SPILOMELINAE,   CRAMBIDAE,   PYRALOIDEA
 
Don Herbison-Evans
(donherbisonevans@outlook.com)
and
Stella Crossley


(Photo: courtesy of the Macleay Museum, University of Sydney)

The Caterpillar of this species is green with black knobs on. It bores into the stems of various Australian native shrubs, including :

  • Bottlebrush ( Callistemon, MYRTACEAE ).

    The entrance hole becomes covered in a bundle of silk and frass.


    (Photo: courtesy of the Macleay Museum, University of Sydney)

    The adult moth has fawn wings, with a large greenish-golden patch on each forewing, and a gold mark near each forewing tip. In its natural posture, the moth has the forewings closed over the hindwings forming an equilateral triangle. The moth sits with its nose up and tail down, like a Concord aircraft landing. The moth has a wingspan of only 2 cms.


    (Specimen: courtesy of the Macleay Museum, University of Sydney)

    Specimens have been caught in

  • Queensland,
  • New South Wales, and
  • Victoria.


    Further reading :

    Edward Meyrick,
    On the Classification of Australian Pyralidina,
    Transactions of The Entomological Society of London,
    1884, pp. 323-324.

    Buck Richardson,
    Tropical Queensland Wildlife from Dusk to Dawn Science and Art,
    LeapFrogOz, Kuranda, 2015, p. 34.


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    (updated 23 August 2012)