Idaea costaria (Walker, 1863)
White-edged Wave
(previously known as Acidalia costaria)
STERRHINAE,   GEOMETRIDAE,   GEOMETROIDEA
 
Don Herbison-Evans
(donherbisonevans@outlook.com)
and
Stella Crossley

Idaea costaria
(Photo: courtesy of Steve Williams,
Moths of Victoria: Part 3)

These caterpillars are a patchy brown, with a wrinkly skin. They are missing two pairs of prolegs so walk in a looper fashion. If disturbed on their foodplant, they readily drop to the ground. It is not clear what they prefer to feed on. In captivity they fed on fresh and dead leaves of Eucalyptus mellidora, but did not thrive.

Idaea costaria
pupa
(Photo: courtesy of Peter Marriott,
Moths of Victoria: Part 3)

The pupa is brown.

Idaea costaria
mating pair, female on the left
(Photo: courtesy of Peter Marriott,
Moths of Victoria: Part 3)

The adult moths are also brown, with complex variable dark patterns on the wings. The costa of each forewing is pale brown, and they are joined by a pale line across the head. The wingspan is about 1.5 cms.

Idaea costaria
(Photo: copyright of Brett and Marie Smith, at Ellura Sanctuary, South Australia)

The species has been found in :

  • Queensland,
  • New South Wales,
  • Australian Capital Territory,
  • Victoria,
  • Tasmania,
  • South Australia, and
  • Western Australia.

    Idaea costaria
    underside
    (Photo: copyright of Brett and Marie Smith, at Ellura Sanctuary, South Australia)


    Further reading:

    Peter Marriott,
    Moths of Victoria: Part 3,
    Waves & Carpets - GEOMETROIDEA (C)
    ,
    Entomological Society of Victoria, 2011, pp. 6-7, 10-11.

    Francis Walker,
    Geometrites,
    List of the Specimens of Lepidopterous Insects in the Collection of the British Museum,
    Part 26 (1863), p. 1610.


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    (updated 25 May 2012, 10 June 2018)