Aglaopus pyrrhata (Walker, 1866)
(one synonym : Striglina australina Guenée, 1877)
STRIGLININAE ,   THYRIDIDAE ,   THYRIDOIDEA
 
Don Herbison-Evans
(donherbisonevans@outlook.com)
and
Dave Britton & Stella Crossley

Aglaopus pyrrhata
(Photo: copyright Dave Britton, Australian Museum)

The Caterpillars of this species are orange with a black head. They have been found feeding on the foliage of various species of Gum Trees ( Eucalyptus, MYRTACEAE ), including :

  • Snow Gum ( Eucalyptus pauciflora ), and
  • Forest Red Gum ( Eucalyptus tereticornis ).

    The Caterpillar lives in a conical shelter created by rolling the cut edge of a leaf, expelling faecal pellets from the aperture at the narrow end of the cone. If disturbed, the Caterpillar exudes a green liquid from its mouth.

    The Caterpillar pupates in its shelter.

    The adult moths vary in colour from brown to orange, always with a pinkish tinge, and have an indistinct darker line across each wing. It rests with a posture characteristic of the family with the wings curved in a shape like a wave. The wingspan is about 3 cms.

    Aglaopus pyrrhata
    underside
    (Specimen: courtesy of the Macleay Museum, University of Sydney)

    The species is found over most of mainland Australia, including

  • Queensland.
  • New South Wales,
  • Australian Capital Territory,
  • Victoria, and
  • South Australia.


    Further reading :

    Ian F.B. Common,
    Moths of Australia, Melbourne University Press, 1990, pls. 8.19, 25.13, p. 341.

    Francis Walker,
    Catalogue of Lepidoptera Heterocera,
    List of the Specimens of Lepidopterous Insects in the Collection of the British Museum,
    Part 35, Supplement 5 (1866), p. 1575.


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    (updated 3 April 2013, 27 October 2013)