Epiphyas ashworthana (Newman, 1856)
(one synonym : Teras responsana Walker, 1863)
ARCHIPINI,   TORTRICINAE,   TORTRICIDAE,   TORTRICOIDEA
 
Don Herbison-Evans
(donherbisonevans@outlook.com)
and
Stella Crossley


(photo courtesy of Merlin Crossley, Melbourne, Victoria)

This Caterpillar is small and green with a pale brown head capsule. It grows to a length of about 2 cms. It has been found in December in Melbourne feeding on :

  • Silver Wattle ( Acacia dealbata, MIMOSACEAE ), and
  • Cootamundra Wattle ( Acacia baileyana, MIMOSACEAE ).

    It conceals itself by making a protective cluster of silk-bowed wattle fronds. If disturbed, it will flee by wriggling backwards.

    The pupa is formed between leaves joined by silk. Initially it is bright green, but it turns brown after a day or so. In summer, the pupal duration is only about a week.


    (Photo: courtesy of Donald Hobern, Aranda, Australian Capital Territory)

    The adults have forewings that are brown with various black dots, and paler bands along the margin and at the base. The hind wings are brown with a cream edge along the costa. The moths have a resting shape like the outline of a bell. They have a wingspan of about 2 cms.


    (Photo: courtesy of CSIRO/BIO Photography Group, Centre for Biodiversity Genomics, University of Guelph)

    The species occurs over much of Australia, including:

  • Queensland,
  • New South Wales,
  • Australian Capital Territory,
  • Victoria,
  • Tasmania, and
  • South Australia.


    Further reading :

    Edward Newman,
    Characters of a few Australian Lepidoptera, Collected by Mr. Thomas R. Oxley,
    Transactions of the Entomological Society of London,
    New Series, Volume III, Number 8 (1856), pp. 286-287.


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    (updated 3 September 2011, 21 November 2018)